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Chatper 10 : Water and Other Beverages

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Water and Other Beverages, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Drinking water is water from taps, fountains, or other sources that is purified or naturally safe for drinking. Beverages include bottled water, soft drinks, fruit and vegetable juices, and ice. Drinking water and other beverages can carry viruses, bacteria, protozoa, and helminths. Bottled water is water intended for drinking and filled in sealed bottles. Bottled, branded, carbonated, and unopened water is mostly safe. Rarely have outbreaks been associated with bottled water. An emerging potential risk is enteric viruses in bottled water. Increasing maintenance costs and biofilms that support growth of environmental mycobacteria and of in hot-water systems are emerging threats. in drinking water is an indicator of fecal pollution. Private supplies in high-income countries are typically small (for single houses, hamlets, and camps), using untreated water from boreholes, wells, or rain tanks. Low-income supplies are unimproved supplies in low-income countries, using untreated water from unprotected wells or springs, surfaces (canals, rivers, and ponds), or vendors. Untreated well water is an infrequent source of infection in humans. For , drinking water is an alternative to water plants. Untreated water is an occasional source of serovar Typhi in high-income countries. is endemic in low-income countries, and outbreaks from untreated waters are a risk. Untreated water is a risk for Vibrio, including from lakes, streams, municipal supplies, large water vessels, and during droughts when water is scarce. Drinking water is the only vehicle for acquisition of .

Citation: Stürchler D. 2006. Water and Other Beverages, p 193-204. In Exposure. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817510.ch10

Key Concept Ranking

Hepatitis E virus
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References

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Tables

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Table 10.1

Outbreaks from drinking water by known infectious disease agents in high-income countries

Citation: Stürchler D. 2006. Water and Other Beverages, p 193-204. In Exposure. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817510.ch10

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