1887

Chatper 13 : Human Leisure and Lifestyle

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $30.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Human Leisure and Lifestyle, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817510/9781555813765_Chap13-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817510/9781555813765_Chap13-2.gif

Abstract:

This chapter documents various infections caused by microorganisms and viruses that occurred to humans in the past at public places and gatherings such as fairs and mass gatherings, catered events and restaurants, swimming pools and spas, outdoor sports and hobbies, indoor sports and hobbies, and also under other circumstances like female prostitution, sex among men and injection drug use. At regional, crowded indoor fairs, locally prevalent respiratory viral and bacterial agents are likely to circulate. At international fairs a broad agent spectrum must be assumed, including intentionally released, weaponized agents. Catered events include commercial venues that sell ready-to-eat foods. In France, about one third of food-borne outbreaks occur at private parties. Sources of contaminated pool water are people animals, and runoff water. Infections are acquired from ingestion (swallow), inhalation (aerosol), or contact. Skin manifestations from exposure to artificial recreational water include dermatitis (by and ), granuloma (by environmental mycobacteria), external otitis, and keratitis (by free-living amebas). Fecal perils exist in camps, including from poor hand and kitchen hygiene, unsafe drinking water, lack of latrines, and animal manure on campgrounds. Water, soil, and plant contacts are potential hazards, including from gardening and hiking. Infections from indoor leisure activities are poorly documented or rare. Members of sports teams and visitors of parties, discos, bars, and night clubs are potential victims and sources of respiratory tract infections.

Citation: Stürchler D. 2006. Human Leisure and Lifestyle, p 303-334. In Exposure. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817510.ch13

Key Concept Ranking

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
0.46903762
Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
0.43133366
Hemorrhagic Fever With Renal Syndrome
0.422485
0.46903762
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of Figure 13.1
Figure 13.1

Recreational water-related disease outbreaks, United States 2001–2002. The number of outbreaks (axis, = 65) is given by month (axis) and syndromes: gastroenteritis (black), dermatitis (light gray), meningoencephalitis (white), and others, e.g., respiratory or chemical (hatched). From reference 8340.

Citation: Stürchler D. 2006. Human Leisure and Lifestyle, p 303-334. In Exposure. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817510.ch13
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817510.chap13

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 13.1

Outbreaks from treated recreational waters (swimming pools and spas) by known infectious disease agents: United States 1990–2002

Citation: Stürchler D. 2006. Human Leisure and Lifestyle, p 303-334. In Exposure. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817510.ch13
Generic image for table
Table 13.2

Risk of HIV acquisition from exposure to HIV-positive sources

Citation: Stürchler D. 2006. Human Leisure and Lifestyle, p 303-334. In Exposure. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817510.ch13

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error