1887

Chatper 17 : Noninvasive Procedures

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $30.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Noninvasive Procedures, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817510/9781555813765_Chap17-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817510/9781555813765_Chap17-2.gif

Abstract:

Millions of noninvasive procedures are being performed in hospitals and outpatient settings without harm. The colonizations or infections that result from materials that are summarized in this chapter underscore diversity rather than magnitude of exposure. Risks of cross-infection (material-to-patient spread) likely originate from reusing, handling, or storing materials rather than from producing or transporting bulk material. Transesophageal echocardiography probes were implicated in three cases of pneumonia; strains from patients and water from rinsing probes were indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Machines include respiratory ventilators, medication nebulizers, spirometers, and humidifiers. Sources of contamination include tap water, cleaning water, and hands of service or health workers. Postendoscopic infections include urinary tract infections (UTI), pneumonia, and bloodstream infection (BSI). As bronchoscopy can induce coughing and generation of aerosols, infection risks should be considered before endoscopy in carriers and incubating, ill, or recovering patients, mainly for prions, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and . Drugs are substances intended for preventive, curative, or stimulating use in humans, including illicit drugs, herbs and other alternative remedies, apothecaries, pharmaceuticals, and bioproducts. Experimental drugs are reported vehicles of viruses, bacteria, and fungi. Antimicrobials are substances used in vivo against multiplying viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, e.g., antiretrovirals, macrolides, β-lactams, tuberculostatics, and antimalarials. Person-to-person spread is confirmed for , , and (Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus [CCHFV]) of Bunyaviridae.

Citation: Stürchler D. 2006. Noninvasive Procedures, p 441-466. In Exposure. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817510.ch17

Key Concept Ranking

Rift Valley fever virus
0.5508686
Lower Respiratory Tract Infections
0.5084959
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
0.49889237
Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus
0.4590571
0.5508686
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of Figure 17.1
Figure 17.1

Nosocomial agents from ICU patients: resistance prevalence, United States, 1998–2003. Boxes represent standard deviations (1998–2002) and dots show 1-year prevalences (January to November 2003, >1,000 isolates /series). 3 Ceph, expanded-spectrum cephalosporins. From reference 1230.

Citation: Stürchler D. 2006. Noninvasive Procedures, p 441-466. In Exposure. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817510.ch17
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817510.chap17

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 17.1

Agents of nosocomial pneumonia

Citation: Stürchler D. 2006. Noninvasive Procedures, p 441-466. In Exposure. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817510.ch17
Generic image for table
Table 17.2

Nosocomial transmission of viral hemorrhagic fevers

Citation: Stürchler D. 2006. Noninvasive Procedures, p 441-466. In Exposure. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817510.ch17

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error