1887

Chatper 3 : Wild Vertebrates

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $30.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Wild Vertebrates, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817510/9781555813765_Chap03-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817510/9781555813765_Chap03-2.gif

Abstract:

This chapter focuses on wild vertebrates which include carnivores, rodents, lagomorphs, primates, bats, birds, fish, reptiles and amphibians. Global trade, hunting safaris, sileage feeding, and habitat reduction increase chances of encounters with wild vertebrates, infections that cross from wildlife to livestock (e.g., ), and jumps of agents across species to humans, e.g., human immunodeficiency virus (from primates in Africa), monkeypox virus (from Gambian giant rats imported into the United States), and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) (from carnivores in China). By habitat and invertebrate vector, wild herbivores maintain zoonotic viruses, bacteria, and protozoa. In the African rain forest, hunters handling dead duikers (, a small forest herbivore) are suspected of triggering infection chains and outbreaks. In Africa and Southwest Asia, hyraxes ( and ) are natural hosts of . Transmissible mink encephalopathy is sporadically diagnosed in farmed mink (). Seroreactivity in carnivores may merely reflect past exposure to arthropod-borne viruses. Skunks, weasles, raccoons, and red and gray foxes are presumed reservoir hosts of Powassan virus. infects mice and other rodents. Viruses reported in laboratory rodents include cytomegalovirus and ectromelia virus. Rodents in Africa, including squirrels ( and ) and Gambian rats (), are likely reservoirs of Monkeypox virus (MPXV). The mammalian order Lagomorpha includes hares and rabbits (Leporidae) and pikas (Ochotonidae). Bordetella bronchiseptica and Pasteurella multocida commonly colonize the upper respiratory tract of laboratory and wild lagomorphs. Infections in humans can result from handling living or dead animals.

Citation: Stürchler D. 2006. Wild Vertebrates, p 37-63. In Exposure. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817510.ch3

Key Concept Ranking

Rift Valley fever virus
0.5417226
Eastern equine encephalitis virus
0.5339837
Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus
0.5339837
Eastern equine encephalitis virus
0.5339837
Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus
0.5339837
0.5417226
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817510.chap3

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 3.1

Hantaviruses reported in humans, by geography and rodent host

Citation: Stürchler D. 2006. Wild Vertebrates, p 37-63. In Exposure. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817510.ch3

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error