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Chapter 1 : Historical Perspectives on the Family

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Abstract:

This chapter talks about the identification of many additional groups of . Most of the organisms originally surfaced because of their association with outbreaks of diarrheal disease in children. By far the single greatest phenotypic feature that has led to various classification schemes is lactose fermentation. This single marker has resulted in the introduction of a number of perplexing and equivocal terms into the scientific and medical literature. As new biochemical and antigenic types were discovered, the paracolon group was often subdivided on the basis of indole, methyl red, Voges-Proskauer, and citrate (IMViC) reactions. The principal features identifying isolates as members of the family are listed in this chapter. In its infancy, the were over classified because antigenic and biochemical variants of previously described groups were often thought to represent new taxa. The use of such taxonomic tools led to the creation of new taxa from unnamed groups ( and ) or removal of species from previously recognized genera ( from ). Since criteria for genetic relatedness are somewhat subjective for species assignment, and even more so at the genus and family levels, the essential fact of this classification system is that it functionally works. To demonstrate this point is the fact that both and are genetically indistinguishable at the species level; strains from each group are 70 to 100% related to one another.

Citation: Janda J, Abbott S. 2006. Historical Perspectives on the Family , p 1-6. In The Enterobacteria, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817541.ch1

Key Concept Ranking

Clinical and Public Health
1.4422075
Bacterial Classification
1.186131
Gram-Negative Bacteria
0.97858423
Enterobacter cloacae
0.54941237
Klebsiella pneumoniae
0.54545456
1.4422075
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Figures

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Figure 1.

Taxonomic evolution of some subgroups within the paracolon group.

Citation: Janda J, Abbott S. 2006. Historical Perspectives on the Family , p 1-6. In The Enterobacteria, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817541.ch1
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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1.

Previous designations for

Citation: Janda J, Abbott S. 2006. Historical Perspectives on the Family , p 1-6. In The Enterobacteria, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817541.ch1
Generic image for table
Table 2.

Major phenotypic features of the

Citation: Janda J, Abbott S. 2006. Historical Perspectives on the Family , p 1-6. In The Enterobacteria, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817541.ch1
Generic image for table
Table 3.

Evolution of groups within the according to Bergey's manuals

Citation: Janda J, Abbott S. 2006. Historical Perspectives on the Family , p 1-6. In The Enterobacteria, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817541.ch1

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