1887

Chapter 21 : Phytopathogenic and Miscellaneous Members of the Family

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $15.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Phytopathogenic and Miscellaneous Members of the Family , Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817541/9781555813420_Chap21-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817541/9781555813420_Chap21-2.gif

Abstract:

The creation of the genus began the process of taxonomically redefining phytopathogenic strains residing in the family into appropriate taxa. Currently, four major genera contain most known phytopathogenic species. These genera are , , , and . Early studies by Bottone and colleagues described the role that yellow-pigmented played in causing human illnesses, ranging from conditions such as septicemia to brain abscess formation. These isolates were initially identified as yellow-pigmented erwiniae that today would be classified as . has also been associated with cotton fever in drug addicts and in cases of nosocomial pseudobacteremia traced to nonsterile blood collection tubes. Only recently have molecular investigations implicated several non-agglomerans phytopathogenic species as human pathogens. Despite progress being made on taxonomic issues regarding the correct classification of phytopathogenic genera and species, little progress has been made on standardization of identification schemes to separate these species. No formal studies of the susceptibility of true pantoeae to therapeutically active antimicrobial agents have been reported since their transfer to the genus . The chapter also talks about miscellaneous genera that includes , and .

Citation: Janda J, Abbott S. 2006. Phytopathogenic and Miscellaneous Members of the Family , p 377-384. In The Enterobacteria, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817541.ch21

Key Concept Ranking

16s rRNA Sequencing
0.557066
Erwinia
0.5386852
Erwinia herbicola
0.5273445
Erwinia carotovora
0.518974
0.557066
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of Figure 1
Figure 1

Symplasmata of recovered from syneresis fluid on a urea slant.

Citation: Janda J, Abbott S. 2006. Phytopathogenic and Miscellaneous Members of the Family , p 377-384. In The Enterobacteria, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817541.ch21
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817541.chap21
1. Aldova, E.,, O. Hausner,, D. J. Brenner,, Z. Kocmoud,, J. Schindler,, B. Potužníkova,, and P. Petráš. 1988. Pragia fontium gen. nov. of the family Enterobacteriaceae, isolated from water. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 38:183189.
2. Astagneau, P.,, S. Gottot,, Y. Gobin,, P. Bocquet,, C. Gatignol,, P. Jouvet,, and G. Brücker. 1994. Nosocomial outbreak of Enterobacter agglomerans pseudobacteraemia associated with nonsterile blood collection tubes. J. Hosp. Infect. 27:7375.
3. Baumann, P.,, L. Baumann,, M. A. Clark,, and M. L. Thao. 1998. Buchnera aphidicola: the endosymbiont of aphids. ASM News 64:203209.
4. Bottone, E.,, and S. S. Schneirson. 1972. Erwinia species: an emerging human pathogen. Am. J. Clin. Pathol. 57:400405.
5. Brown, E. W.,, R. M. Davis,, C. Gouk,, and T. van der Zwet. 2000. Phylogenetic relationships of necrogenic Erwinia and Brenneria species as revealed by glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene sequences. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. 50:20572068.
6. Chattopadhyay, A.,, N. B. Bhatnagar,, and R. Bhatnager. 2004. Bacterial insecticidal toxins. Crit. Rev. Microbiol. 30:3354.
7. Dale, C.,, and S. C. Welburn. 2001. The endosymbionts of tsetse flies: manipulating host-parasite interactions. Int. J. Parasitol. 31:628631.
8. De Baere, T.,, R. Verhelst,, C. Labit,, G. Verschraegen,, G. Wauters,, G. Claeys,, and M. Vaneechoutte. 2004. Bacteremic infection with Pantoea ananatis. J. Clin. Microbiol. 42:43934395.
9. De Baere, T.,, G. Wauters,, P. Kämpfer,, C. Labit,, G. Claeys,, G. Verschraegen,, and M. Vaneechoutte. 2002. Isolation of Buttiauxella gaviniae from a spinal cord patient with urinary bladder pathology. J. Clin. Microbiol. 40:28673870.
10. De Champs, C.,, S. Le Seaux,, J. J. Dubost,, S. Boisgard,, S. Sauvezie,, and J. Sirot. 2000. Isolation of Pantoea agglomerans in two cases of septic monoarthritis after plant thorn and wood sliver injuries. J. Clin. Microbiol. 38:460461.
11. Dye, D. W. 1968. A taxonomic study of the genus Erwinia. I. The “amylovora” group. N. Z. J. Sci. 12:590607.
12. Dye, D. W. 1969. A taxonomic study of the genus Erwinia. II. The “carotovora” group. N. Z. J. Sci. 12:8197.
13. Dye, D. W. 1969. A taxonomic study of the genus Erwinia. III. The “herbicola” group. N. Z. J. Sci. 12:223236.
14. Dye, D. W. 1969. A taxonomic study of the genus Erwinia. IV. Atypical erwinias. N. Z. J. Sci. 12:833839.
15. Farmer, J. J.,, III. 2003. Enterobacteriaceae: introduction and identification, p. 636653. In P. R. Murray,, E. J. Baron,, J. H. Jorgensen,, M. A. Pfaller,, and R. H. Yolken (ed.), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 8th ed. American Society for Microbiology, Washington, D.C.
16. Ferguson, R.,, C. Feeney,, and V. A. Chirurgi. 1993. Enterobacter agglomerans-associated cotton fever. Arch. Intern. Med. 153:23812382.
17. Forst, S.,, and K. Nealson. 1996. Molecular biology of the symbiotic-pathogenic bacteria Xenorhabdus spp. and Photorhabdus spp. Microbiol. Rev. 60:2143.
18. Francino, M. P.,, S. R. Santos,, and H. Ochman,. 2003. Phylogenetic relationships of bacteria with special reference to endosymbionts and enteric species. In M. Dworkin,, S. Falkow,, E. Rosenberg,, K.-H. Schleifer,, and E. Stackebrandt (ed.), The Prokaryotes: an Evolving Electronic Resource for the Microbiological Community, 3rd ed. Release 3.13. [Online.] Springer-Verlag, New York, N.Y. http:// 141.150.157.117:8080/prokPUB/index.htm.
19. Gavini, F.,, J. Mergaert,, A. Beji,, C. Mielcarek,, D. Izard,, K. Kersters,, and J. De Ley. 1989. Transfer of Enterobacter agglomerans (Beijerinck 1888) Ewing and Fife 1972 to Pantoea gen. nov. as Pantoea agglomerans comb. nov. and description of Pantoea dispersa sp. nov. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 39:337345.
20. Gilardi, G. L.,, and E. Bottone. 1971. Erwinia and yellowpigmented Enterobacter isolates from human sources. Antonie Leeuwenhoek 37:529535.
21. Hauben, L.,, E. R. B. Moore,, L. Vauterin,, M. Steenackers,, J. Mergaert,, L. Verdonck,, and J. Swings. 1998. Phylogenetic position of phytopathogens within the Enterobacteriaceae. Syst. Appl. Microbiol. 21:384397.
22. Janda, J. M., 2002. New members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. In M. Dworkin,, S. Falkow,, E. Rosenberg,, K.-H. Schleifer,, and E. Stackebrandt (ed.), The Prokaryotes: an Evolving Electronic Resource for the Microbiological Community, 3rd ed. Release 3.9. [Online.] Springer-Verlag, New York, N.Y. http://141.150.157.117:8080/prokPUB/index.htm.
23. Kado, C. I., 2000. Erwinia and related genera. In M. Dworkin,, S. Falkow,, E. Rosenberg,, K.-H. Schleifer,, and E. Stackebrandt (ed.), The Prokaryotes: an Evolving Electronic Resource for the Microbiological Community, 3rd ed. Release 3.2. [Online.] Springer-Verlag, New York, N.Y. http://141.150.157.117:8080/prokPUB/index.htm.
24. Khetmalas, M. B.,, A. K. Bal,, L. D. Noble,, and J. A. Gow. 1996. Pantoea agglomerans is the etiological agent for black spot necrosis on beach peas. Can. J. Microbiol. 42:12521257.
25. Kim, W.-S.,, L. Garda,, S.-L. Rhim,, and K. Geider. 1999. Erwinia pyrifoliae sp. nov., a novel pathogen that affects Asian pear trees (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai). Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 49:899906.
26. Kratz, A.,, D. Greenberg,, Y. Barki,, E. Cohen,, and M. Lifshitz. 2003. Pantoea agglomerans as a cause of septic arthritis after palm tree thorn injury; case report and literature review. Arch. Dis. Child. 88:542544.
27. Laporte, C.,, M. C. Demachy,, and C. Thevenin-Lemoine. 2002. Tibial osteitis caused by Pantoea agglomerans after open grade IIIB tibial shaft fracture. Rev. Chir. Orthop. Reparatrice Appar. Mot. 88:625627.
28. Lindh, E.,, P. Kjaeldgaard,, W. Frederiksen,, and J. Ursing. 1991. Phenotypical properties of Enterobacter agglomerans (Pantoea agglomerans) from human, animal and plant sources. Acta Pathol. Microbiol. Immunol. Scand. 99:347352.
29. Maugueret, T. M.-J.,, and S. L. Walker. 2002. Rapid detection of Obesumbacterium proteus from yeast and wort using polymerase chain reaction. Lett. Appl. Microbiol. 35: 281284.
30. Mergaert, J.,, L. Verdonck,, and K. Kersters. 1993. Transfer of Erwinia ananas (synonym, Erwinia uredovora) and Erwinia stewartii to the genus Pantoea emend. as Pantoea ananas (Serrano 1928) comb. nov. and Pantoea stewartii (Smith 1898) comb. nov., respectively, and description of Pantoea stewartii subsp. indologenes subsp. nov. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 43:162173.
31. Müller, H. E.,, D. J. Brenner,, G. R. Fanning,, P. A. D. Grimont,, and P. Kämpfer. 1996. Emended description of Buttiauxella agrestis with recognition of six new species of Buttiauxella and two new species of Kluyvera: Buttiauxella ferragutiae sp. nov., Buttiauxella gaviniae sp. nov., Buttiauxella brennerae sp. nov., Buttiauxella izardii sp. nov., Buttiauxella noackiae sp. nov., Buttiauxella warmboldiae sp. nov., Kluyvera cochleae sp. nov., and Kluyvera georgiana sp. nov. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 46:5063.
32. O’Hara, C. M.,, A. G. Steigerwalt,, B. C. Hill,, J. M. Miller,, and D. J. Brenner. 1998. First report of a human isolate of Erwinia persicinus. J. Clin. Microbiol. 36:248250.
33. Pujol, C. J.,, and C. I. Kado. 2000. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the pathway in Pantoea citrea leading to pink disease of pineapple. J. Bacteriol. 182:22302237.
34. Schmid, H.,, C. Weber,, J. R. Bogner,, and S. Schubert. 2003. Isolation of a Pantoea dispersa-like strain from a 71-year-old woman with acute myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma. Infection 31:6667.
35. Schubert, R. H.,, and S. Groeger-Sohn. 1998. Detection of Budvicia aquatica and Pragia fontium and occurrence in surface waters. Zentbl. Hyg. Umweltmed. 201:371376.
36. Spröer, C.,, U. Mendrock,, J. Swiderski,, E. Land,, and E. Stackebrandt. 1999. The phylogenetic position of Serratia, Buttiauxella and other genera of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 49:14331438.
37. Sutra, L.,, R. Christen,, C. Bollet,, P. Simoneau,, and L. Gardan. 2001. Samsonia erythrinae gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from bark necrotic lesions of Erythrina sp., and discrimination of plant-pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae by phenotypic features. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. 51:12911304.
38. Ulloa-Gutierrez, R.,, T. Moya,, and M. L. Avila-Aguero. 2004. Pantoea agglomerans and thorn-associated suppurative arthritis. Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J. 23:690.
39. Wernegreen, J. J. 2002. Genome evolution in bacterial endosymbionts of insects. Nat. Rev. Genet. 3:850860.
40. Wernegreen, J. J. 2004. Endosymbiosis: lessons in conflict resolution. PLoS Biol. 2:307311.
41. Zreik, L.,, J. M. Bové,, and M. Garnier. 1998. Phylogenetic characterization of the bacterium-like organism associated with marginal chlorosis of strawberry and proposition of a Candidatus taxon for the organism, ‘Candidatus Phlomobacter fragariae.’ Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. 48:257261.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1

Selected examples of enterobacteria associated with diseases in plants or trees

Citation: Janda J, Abbott S. 2006. Phytopathogenic and Miscellaneous Members of the Family , p 377-384. In The Enterobacteria, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817541.ch21
Generic image for table
Table 2

Distinguishing biochemical features of phytopathogenic enterobacterial species associated with clinical specimens

Citation: Janda J, Abbott S. 2006. Phytopathogenic and Miscellaneous Members of the Family , p 377-384. In The Enterobacteria, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817541.ch21

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error