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Chapter 39 : Antimicrobial Use in Animals in the United States: Developments in Policy and Practice

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Antimicrobial Use in Animals in the United States: Developments in Policy and Practice, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Since the early 1950s, antimicrobials have been used in companion, sport, and food animals to treat bacterial infections and to control or prevent their spread throughout populations. While it seems clear from even the most conservative industry estimates that the total amount of antimicrobials administered to animals in the United States is not insignificant relative to use in human medicine, the exact quantity administered annually remains unknown. In the United States, antimicrobial resistance surveillance is conducted through the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System-Enteric Bacteria (NARMS). NARMS monitors changes in antimicrobial drug susceptibilities of selected bacteria in food animals, humans, and retail meats in relation to antimicrobial agents of importance in human and food animal medicine. Indicator species monitored by NARMS include strains of , , , , , and . The only official data on antimicrobial use in animals available to the public are annual surveys conducted by the National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) of U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics (APUA) established an Advisory Committee on Animal Antimicrobial Use Data Collection in the United States in the spring of 2002 in order to address methodological issues surrounding domestic food animal antimicrobial use surveillance. Citing concerns for food safety, some multinational food-industry corporations have also become involved in issues relating to antimicrobial use in food animals in recent years.

Citation: Devincent S, Viola C. 2005. Antimicrobial Use in Animals in the United States: Developments in Policy and Practice, p 528-536. In White D, Alekshun M, McDermott P (ed), Frontiers in Antimicrobial Resistance. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817572.ch39

Key Concept Ranking

Bacterial Diseases
0.9961384
Antimicrobial Resistance
0.79695874
Campylobacter jejuni
0.55264264
0.9961384
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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1.

Reports on antimicrobial use in animals and the impact on human health ,

Inclusion criteria: (i) report content exclusively or primarily focused on antimicrobial use in animals and impact on human health; (ii) substantial portion of report dedicated to review of peer-reviewed scientific evidence; (iii) scope of evidence considered in report is relatively broad (i.e., risk assessments for a single drug-outcome pair excluded); (iv) English language publication accessible to the public; and (v) authors of report independent of regulatory agency.

Table format based on NRC 1999.

Citation: Devincent S, Viola C. 2005. Antimicrobial Use in Animals in the United States: Developments in Policy and Practice, p 528-536. In White D, Alekshun M, McDermott P (ed), Frontiers in Antimicrobial Resistance. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817572.ch39

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