1887

Chapter 8 : Bacterial Promiscuity: How Bacterial Sex Contributes to Development of Resistance

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $7.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Bacterial Promiscuity: How Bacterial Sex Contributes to Development of Resistance, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817602/9781555812980_Chap08-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817602/9781555812980_Chap08-2.gif

Abstract:

Antibiotics bind to and inactivate important bacterial targets such as the enzymes that assemble the bacterial cell wall or components of ribosomes that make bacterial proteins. By mutating such a target to a form that no longer binds the antibiotic, a bacterium can become resistant to that antibiotic. A bacterium can easily fix this problem by acquiring mutations in the promoter region of the gene, the region that controls whether a messenger RNA (mRNA) copy is made and translated into the resistance protein. Bacteria can acquire new DNA from each other by any one of three processes: conjugation (direct cell-to-cell transfer of DNA), transformation (uptake of DNA from the environment), and bacteriophage transduction (transfer by bacterial viruses. In a controversial laboratory experiment, a scientist had shown that could transfer its vancomycin resistance genes to . The concern expressed by the antibiotechnology activists was that the bacterial antibiotic resistance genes lodged in the plant genome might be released in an intact form from the plant cells during digestion in the human intestinal tract and be taken up by human intestinal bacteria. If the resistance genes were retained by the transformed intestinal bacteria, these bacteria might become resistant to ampicillin. Numerous groups of scientists met all over the world to discuss this possibility. A combination of resistance to antibiotics and resistance to some antiseptics or disinfectants could be deadly, not only for hospital patients but also for sick people in the community.

Citation: Salyers A, Whitt D. 2005. Bacterial Promiscuity: How Bacterial Sex Contributes to Development of Resistance, p 98-115. In Revenge of the Microbes. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817602.ch8

Key Concept Ranking

Bacterial Pathogenesis
0.5935419
Bacterial Proteins
0.58895504
Bacterial Cell Wall
0.48420182
Cell Wall Components
0.4295934
0.5935419
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of Figure 8.1
Figure 8.1

Bacterial conjugation. Bacterial DNA, in this case in the form of a plasmid, is transferred from one cell to another by cell-to-cell contact.

Citation: Salyers A, Whitt D. 2005. Bacterial Promiscuity: How Bacterial Sex Contributes to Development of Resistance, p 98-115. In Revenge of the Microbes. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817602.ch8
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 8.2
Figure 8.2

Integration of two gene cassettes, carrying promoterless resistance genes X and Y into an integron. The integron supplies the promoter (P) and an integrase gene (). The shaded circle represents the insertion site. Arrows represent the direction of transcription. (Reprinted from A. A. Salyers and D. D. Whitt, , ASM Press, Washington, D. C., 2002.)

Citation: Salyers A, Whitt D. 2005. Bacterial Promiscuity: How Bacterial Sex Contributes to Development of Resistance, p 98-115. In Revenge of the Microbes. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817602.ch8
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817602.chap08

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 8.1

Antibiotic resistance genes in from uninfected people (community isolates) and infected people (clinical isolates)

Citation: Salyers A, Whitt D. 2005. Bacterial Promiscuity: How Bacterial Sex Contributes to Development of Resistance, p 98-115. In Revenge of the Microbes. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817602.ch8

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error