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1 Microbial Pathogens: an Overview

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1 Microbial Pathogens: an Overview, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

This chapter provides an introduction to the main human microbial pathogens, with a description of the clinical features of the disease and emphasis on the cell biology of the infectious process. There is increasing evidence for association of with atherosclerosis. is primarily an animal pathogen, and only in rare cases is it responsible for human respiratory tract infections, oropharyngitis, and atypical pneumonia. has a biphasic developmental cycle with two morphologically different forms: the elementary body (EB), which is the infectious form and is metabolically inactive, and the reticulate body (RB), which results from the differentiation of the EB in the parasitophorous vacuole. The genus includes two related species, the commensal and the pathogenic , the latter being the agent of amebic dysentery and visceral amebiasis, the second leading cause of death due to parasitic disease. Continuous cell growth leads to ulceration of the intestinal mucosa, causing diarrhea and severe intestinal cramps. The diarrhea is then replaced by a condition referred to as dysentery, characterized by intestinal bloody and mucoid exudates. If the condition is not treated, trophozoites of can migrate to the liver, lungs, bones, and brain, where large abscesses may appear. Infections caused by the encapsulated basidiomycetous yeast are initiated by inhalation of the yeast into the lungs and show a remarkable propensity to spread to the brain and meninges.

Citation: Cossart P, Pizarro-Cerdà J, Lecuit M. 2004. 1 Microbial Pathogens: an Overview, p 1-34. In Cossart P, Boquet P, Normark S, Rappuoli R (ed), Cellular Microbiology, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817633.ch1

Key Concept Ranking

Bacterial Proteins
0.56501454
Central Nervous System Diseases
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Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1
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Figures

Image of Figure 1.1
Figure 1.1

Schematic drawing of microbial factors and cellular targets.

Citation: Cossart P, Pizarro-Cerdà J, Lecuit M. 2004. 1 Microbial Pathogens: an Overview, p 1-34. In Cossart P, Boquet P, Normark S, Rappuoli R (ed), Cellular Microbiology, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817633.ch1
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Image of Figure 1.2
Figure 1.2

Examples of scanning and transmission electron micrographs. adhering to a cultured epithelial cell (courtesy of X. Nassif). entering via macropinocytosis in a cultured epithelial cell by inducing membrane ruffling (courtesy of P. Sansonetti). adherent to and invading a cultured cell (from our laboratory). adherent to and invading a cultured cell (courtesy of C. Dehio). penetrating a cultured epithelial cell (courtesy of N. Andrews and E. Robbins). EPEC on the top of pedestals induced on a cultured cell (courtesy of B. Finlay). Conidial heads of (courtesy of J. P. Latgé). tachyzoites free in the cytoplasm of a cultured macrophage, one escaping the cell (reproduced with permission from J. P. Dubey, D. S. Lindsay, and C. A. Speer, . 267–299, 1998). invading via coiling phagocytosis a cultured macrophage (reproduced with permission from M. Horvitz, 27–33, 1984).

Citation: Cossart P, Pizarro-Cerdà J, Lecuit M. 2004. 1 Microbial Pathogens: an Overview, p 1-34. In Cossart P, Boquet P, Normark S, Rappuoli R (ed), Cellular Microbiology, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817633.ch1
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References

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1. Alberts, B.,, D. Bray,, J. Lewis,, M. Raff,, K. Roberts,, and J. D. Watson. 1994. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 3rd ed. Garland, New York, N.Y.
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5. Finlay, B.,, and S. Falkow. 1997. Common themes in microbial pathogenicity revisited. Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev. 61:136169.
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11. Salyers, A. A.,, and D. D. Whitt. 1994. Bacterial Pathogenesis: a Molecular Approach. ASM Press, Washington, D.C.
12. Sussman, M. (ed). 2001. Molecular Medical Microbiology. Academic Press, Inc., New York, N.Y.
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Tables

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Table 1.1

Genomes that have been sequenced

Citation: Cossart P, Pizarro-Cerdà J, Lecuit M. 2004. 1 Microbial Pathogens: an Overview, p 1-34. In Cossart P, Boquet P, Normark S, Rappuoli R (ed), Cellular Microbiology, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817633.ch1

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