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Chapter 34 : and Fish and Frog Models of Infection

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and Fish and Frog Models of Infection, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

is a natural pathogen of poikilothermic organisms including fish and frogs. In addition to , and subsp. can cause natural infection of poikilothermic animals including fish. From the viewpoint of the host, infection in its natural hosts displays the characteristic immune hallmarks of giant-cell formation and granuloma formation that are seen in human tuberculosis. The development of two animal models, the goldfish, , and the leopard frog, , has provided the first natural-infection models for the study of mycobacterial pathogenesis. A relevant observation about the fish model is the similarity of the fish host response to infection and the human host response to infection. Natural infection of reptiles and amphibians with has not been systematically studied. Tadpoles, the developmental stage of the frog, were also susceptible to infection. Thus, the frog model has been used to dissect the complex pattern of gene expression in the granuloma, the site most likely to harbor during the latent stage of infection. In summary, the fish and frog models of mycobacterial infection offer an opportunity to examine the interaction of a species, , with its host in natural infection models. The advantages in using the fish and the frog are that these models reflect a natural-infection model and, in comparison to other animal models, have a low cost.

Citation: Trucksis M, Pritchett C, Reimschuessel R. 2005. and Fish and Frog Models of Infection, p 529-536. In Cole S, Eisenach K, McMurray D, Jacobs, Jr. W (ed), Tuberculosis and the Tubercle Bacillus. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817657.ch34

Key Concept Ranking

Infectious Diseases
0.44600943
16s rRNA Sequencing
0.43143317
Chronic Granulomatous Disease
0.4285854
Mycobacterium marinum
0.42032102
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
0.4089611
0.44600943
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Figures

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Figure 1

The goldfish, Carassius auratus.

Citation: Trucksis M, Pritchett C, Reimschuessel R. 2005. and Fish and Frog Models of Infection, p 529-536. In Cole S, Eisenach K, McMurray D, Jacobs, Jr. W (ed), Tuberculosis and the Tubercle Bacillus. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817657.ch34
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Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

Histopathology of the kidney of a fish infected 8 weeks earlier with M. marinum ATCC 927. The kidney is replaced by granulomas of different morphologies located in the interstitium.

Citation: Trucksis M, Pritchett C, Reimschuessel R. 2005. and Fish and Frog Models of Infection, p 529-536. In Cole S, Eisenach K, McMurray D, Jacobs, Jr. W (ed), Tuberculosis and the Tubercle Bacillus. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817657.ch34
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Image of Figure 3
Figure 3

Sagittal section of a whole zebrafish with mycobacteriosis. G, granulomas in the kidney and viscera due to the bacterial infection. Reprinted from M. L. Kent, J. M. Spitsbergen, J. M. Matthews, J. W. Fournie, and M. Westerfield, 2002, Diseases of Zebrafish in Research Facilities (http://www.zfin.org) with permission.

Citation: Trucksis M, Pritchett C, Reimschuessel R. 2005. and Fish and Frog Models of Infection, p 529-536. In Cole S, Eisenach K, McMurray D, Jacobs, Jr. W (ed), Tuberculosis and the Tubercle Bacillus. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817657.ch34
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Image of Figure 4
Figure 4

The leopard frog, Rana pipiens. Courtesy of Robert N. Fischer, U.S. Geological Survey, San Diego, Calif. (http://www.werc.usgs.gov/fieldguide/).

Citation: Trucksis M, Pritchett C, Reimschuessel R. 2005. and Fish and Frog Models of Infection, p 529-536. In Cole S, Eisenach K, McMurray D, Jacobs, Jr. W (ed), Tuberculosis and the Tubercle Bacillus. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817657.ch34
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Image of Figure 5
Figure 5

Lesions produced in M. marinum-infected frogs. Sections from livers 8 weeks postinfection show typical granulomas during infection with M. marinum. The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Magnification, ×400. Reprinted from reference .

Citation: Trucksis M, Pritchett C, Reimschuessel R. 2005. and Fish and Frog Models of Infection, p 529-536. In Cole S, Eisenach K, McMurray D, Jacobs, Jr. W (ed), Tuberculosis and the Tubercle Bacillus. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817657.ch34
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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1

Minimal infectious dose of M. marinum

Citation: Trucksis M, Pritchett C, Reimschuessel R. 2005. and Fish and Frog Models of Infection, p 529-536. In Cole S, Eisenach K, McMurray D, Jacobs, Jr. W (ed), Tuberculosis and the Tubercle Bacillus. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817657.ch34

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