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Chapter 5 : Challenging Cases

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Abstract:

This section talks about cases in which patients present to their physicians or to the emergency department with gastrointestinal symptoms, such as diarrhea, nausea, and abdominal pain, which might suggest an infection with intestinal parasites. Bacteria and viruses may also cause gastrointestinal symptoms and must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Routine stool cultures detect the most common bacteria which cause gastrointestinal infections; these include species, species, and . Infection with may also cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Although several immunoassays are available to detect the / group, most fecal immunoassays are unable to distinguish between these two species. The specimen submitted for this immunoassay was a fresh specimen and therefore was acceptable for testing. The laboratory diagnosis of amebic dysentery is usually made by examination of fecal specimens for the presence of typical trophozoites and cysts of . Antigen detection methods have been successful in diagnosing amebiasis. Immunofluorescent-antibody methods and enzyme immunoassays have been developed for the detection of the / antigen in stool specimens. Antimicrobial agents used to treat infections with include metronidazole and vancomycin. The laboratory diagnosis of infection with may be made in several ways. The microorganism may be grown in culture by using specially formulated media, such as CCFA (cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose-egg yolk agar). PCR assays for bacterial DNA amplification are currently being investigated.

Citation: Heelan J. 2004. Challenging Cases, p 203-226. In Cases in Human Parasitology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817664.ch5
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Citation: Heelan J. 2004. Challenging Cases, p 203-226. In Cases in Human Parasitology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817664.ch5
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Citation: Heelan J. 2004. Challenging Cases, p 203-226. In Cases in Human Parasitology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817664.ch5
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Citation: Heelan J. 2004. Challenging Cases, p 203-226. In Cases in Human Parasitology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817664.ch5
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Citation: Heelan J. 2004. Challenging Cases, p 203-226. In Cases in Human Parasitology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817664.ch5
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Citation: Heelan J. 2004. Challenging Cases, p 203-226. In Cases in Human Parasitology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817664.ch5
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References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817664.chap5
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