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Chapter 14 : Managing Change

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Abstract:

This chapter helps the reader to understand the changes and trends occurring in the healthcare arena, clarify the paradigm shifts occurring in the healthcare arena, explore why people resist change, instruct the reader on how to become a change agent, discuss survival and winning strategies for workplace changes, and identify the skills needed for the future to succeed in the healthcare arena. People sometimes resist change because they fear that they will be unable to handle the new conditions competently. Being committed to change means, one should be cooperative, and focused and anticipate the next challenge. Exchanging the familiar for the new, even if it’s better, means the “death” of something familiar. Hence it has to be made certain that mourning and recovery are allowed. Each industry has its unique set of paradigm shifts; however, many share some of the same changes. Trends are rapidly changing and so are attitudes, expectations, and roles. More changes are occurring, and this will continue for years to come. Healthcare professionals must become better managers of budget, personnel, self, and business. Opportunities are different and thus different skills are required. Changes are technology driven in addition to being cost driven and driven by legislative issues.

Citation: Frings C. 2004. Managing Change , p 267-273. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch14

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Risk Assessment
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Risk Management
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Translation
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References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817695.chap14
1. Frings, C. S. 1998. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Self-Management & Leadership Strategies for Success, p. 2946. AACC Press, Washington, D.C.
2. Montana, P. J.,, and B. H. Charnov. 1993. Management, 2nd ed. Barron’s Educational Services, Hauppauge, N.Y.
3. Nigon, D. L. 2000. Clinical Laboratory Management, p. 293307. McGraw Hill, New York, N.Y.
4. Wilkinson, I. 1998.Managing ME Incorporated, p. 2328. Clinical Laboratory Management Association, Wayne, Pa.
5. Yeomans, W. N. 1985. 1000 Things You Never Learned In Business School. New American Library, Bergenfield, N.J.

Tables

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Table 14.1

Paradigm shifts in today's healthcare industry

Citation: Frings C. 2004. Managing Change , p 267-273. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch14

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