1887

Chapter 22 : Managing the Laboratory Information System from a Clinical Microbiology Perspective

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $30.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Managing the Laboratory Information System from a Clinical Microbiology Perspective, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817695/9781555812799_Chap22-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817695/9781555812799_Chap22-2.gif

Abstract:

This chapter reviews the principles of laboratory informatics and information system architecture. The potential for the laboratory information system (LIS) to serve as a tool for enhancing the cost-effectiveness and accuracy of microbiology laboratory testing is also discussed. The primary purpose of the LIS is to manage an abundance of laboratory data, and that activity is the foundation of laboratory informatics. In reality, much of the data residing in the LIS are of little concern to the clinical microbiology laboratory. The LIS depends on the master patient index (MPI) for the most current information regarding patient admissions, discharges, and transfers. Usually, this information is sent to the LIS dynamically via an admission/discharge/transfer (ADT) interface. Such an interface obviates the need for manual entry of patient demographic records in the LIS. Clinical microbiology laboratories should be able to realize the many benefits offered by healthcare information systems. Individuals who are well versed in both clinical microbiology and information system technology enable this to happen. The combination of clinical microbiology and laboratory informatics is an excellent fit.

Citation: Campos J. 2004. Managing the Laboratory Information System from a Clinical Microbiology Perspective, p 397-403. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch22

Key Concept Ranking

Molecular Techniques
0.44877818
0.44877818
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817695.chap22
1. Balis, U. J. 1999. Alternative careers in the laboratory re-engineering paradigm. Clin. Lab. Med. 19:453461.
2. Bazzoli, F. 1999. Laboratory systems evolve to meet data demands. Health Data Manag. 7:6671.
3. Block, C. 1997. Benefits and limitations of computerized laboratory data. J. Clin. Pathol. 50:448449.
4. Campos, J. M., 2003. Laboratory consultation, communication, and information systems, p. 3143. In P. R. Murray,, E. J. Baron,, J. H. Jorgensen,, M. A. Pfaller,, and R. H. Yolken (ed.).Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 8th ed. ASM Press, Washington, D.C.
5. Elevitch, F. R. 1999. Prospecting for gold in the data mine. Clin. Lab.Med. 19:373384.
6. Huet, B. 1998. Hospital information system: reusability, designing, modeling, recommendations for implementing. Medinfo 9:952956.
7. Kay, J. D. 2001. Communicating with clinicians. Ann. Clin. Biochem. 38(Pt 2):103110.
8. Kern, D. A.,, and S. T. Bennett. 1999. Quality improvement in the information age. MLO Med. Lab. Obs. 31:2428.
9. McPherson, R. A. 1999. Perspective on the clinical laboratory: new uses for informatics. J. Clin. Lab. Anal. 13:5358.
10. Miller, W. G. 2000. The changing role of the medical technologist from technologist to information specialist. Clin. Leadersh. Manag. Rev. 14:285288.
11. Nutting, P. A.,, D. S. Main,, P. M. Fischer,, T. M. Stull,, M. Pontious,, M. Seifert, Jr.,, D. J. Boone,, and S. Holcomb. 1996. Toward optimal laboratory use. Problems in laboratory testing in primary care. JAMA 275:635639.
12. Oakley, S. 1999. Data mining, distributed networks, and the laboratory. Health Manag. Technol. 20:2631.
13. Workman, R. D.,, M. J. Lewis,, and B. T. Hill. 2000. Enhancing the financial performance of a health system laboratory network using an information system. Am. J. Clin. Pathol. 114:915.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 22.1

Information system terminology

Citation: Campos J. 2004. Managing the Laboratory Information System from a Clinical Microbiology Perspective, p 397-403. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch22
Generic image for table
Table 22.2

Interfaces used to communicate between the LIS and other information systems

Citation: Campos J. 2004. Managing the Laboratory Information System from a Clinical Microbiology Perspective, p 397-403. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch22

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error