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Chapter 24 : Principles of Preanalytic and Postanalytic Test Management

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Abstract:

This chapter deals with the principles of selection, assessment, and incorporation of diagnostic tests. It reviews principles of test evaluation and utilization and their effect on patient outcomes, and describes major elements of requisition and test menu formats. The chapter also reviews principles of formatting reports of test results and the need for record storage. After careful test selection and implementation, the laboratory should evaluate both test utilization and appropriateness of test ordering to best affect cost containment and to achieve the most positive effect on patient outcomes. The preanalytic phase refers to all steps taken before actual testing is performed on a patient’s specimen. It includes the ordering of tests, collection, transportation, handling, storage, and/or referral of specimens, and assessment of all preanalytic activities. Verification includes evaluation of the performance of a new or modified test being introduced into the laboratory. Billing information required would depend on the way the client has the account set up with the laboratory. Laboratories often print the most common tests and their test codes in the test-request section of the requisition for user convenience. Medicare will cover this testing when the diagnosis code(s) provided supports the necessity requirements. The postanalytic phase refers to all steps taken after actual testing is performed on a patient’s specimen. A procedure should be in place for their retention based on the most stringent regulatory requirements for the individual laboratory. The clinical laboratory has an expanding role in today’s healthcare setting.

Citation: Katsaras R, Khalsa A, Smith R, Saubolle M. 2004. Principles of Preanalytic and Postanalytic Test Management, p 417-432. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch24

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Figures

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Figure 24.1

An example of information and instructions in a laboratory users' manual for collection and submission of specimens for evaluation of whooping cough.

Citation: Katsaras R, Khalsa A, Smith R, Saubolle M. 2004. Principles of Preanalytic and Postanalytic Test Management, p 417-432. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch24
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Figure 24.2

Sample of a hard-copy requisition.

Citation: Katsaras R, Khalsa A, Smith R, Saubolle M. 2004. Principles of Preanalytic and Postanalytic Test Management, p 417-432. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch24
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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 24.1

Description of processes in the clinical laboratory

Compiled from references 19 and 36.

Citation: Katsaras R, Khalsa A, Smith R, Saubolle M. 2004. Principles of Preanalytic and Postanalytic Test Management, p 417-432. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch24
Generic image for table
Table 24.2

Applications of laboratory tests

Adapted from references 14 and 37.

Citation: Katsaras R, Khalsa A, Smith R, Saubolle M. 2004. Principles of Preanalytic and Postanalytic Test Management, p 417-432. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch24
Generic image for table
Table 24.3

Properties of useful diagnostic tests

Adapted from reference 37.

Citation: Katsaras R, Khalsa A, Smith R, Saubolle M. 2004. Principles of Preanalytic and Postanalytic Test Management, p 417-432. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch24
Generic image for table
Table 24.4

Parameters for ideal characteristics for screening tests

Adapted from reference 37.

Citation: Katsaras R, Khalsa A, Smith R, Saubolle M. 2004. Principles of Preanalytic and Postanalytic Test Management, p 417-432. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch24
Generic image for table
Table 24.5

Factors affecting decision to implement or discontinue a test

Citation: Katsaras R, Khalsa A, Smith R, Saubolle M. 2004. Principles of Preanalytic and Postanalytic Test Management, p 417-432. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch24
Generic image for table
Table 24.6

Demographic information needed on test requisition

From reference 19.

Citation: Katsaras R, Khalsa A, Smith R, Saubolle M. 2004. Principles of Preanalytic and Postanalytic Test Management, p 417-432. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch24
Generic image for table
Table 24.7

Quality assessment of postanalytic systems should include review or evaluation of the following areas

From references 11 and 19.

Citation: Katsaras R, Khalsa A, Smith R, Saubolle M. 2004. Principles of Preanalytic and Postanalytic Test Management, p 417-432. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch24
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Table 24-8

Sample list of textual “value-added” comments attached to specific laboratory reports.

Citation: Katsaras R, Khalsa A, Smith R, Saubolle M. 2004. Principles of Preanalytic and Postanalytic Test Management, p 417-432. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch24
Generic image for table
Table 24.9

Example of specimen retention requirements by regulatory agency

Citation: Katsaras R, Khalsa A, Smith R, Saubolle M. 2004. Principles of Preanalytic and Postanalytic Test Management, p 417-432. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch24

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