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Chapter 27 : Emergency Management

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Emergency Management, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Programs or plans that respond to disasters and emergency situations are known as emergency preparedness, emergency management, or disaster plans, and the term emergency management plan (EMP) in used in this chapter to refer to these situations. An organized emergency management program begins with a written comprehensive document that defines the scope and goals of the program and lists the responsible individuals. Hazard analysis requires that laboratory personnel prepare a risk assessment for the occurrence of both internal and external disasters or emergencies such as floods, earthquakes, landslides, winter storms, wildfires, volcanoes, windstorms, drought, utility failures, hazard spills, epidemics, reagent shortages, civil disorder, and terrorism. The incident management system is used to manage emergency and disaster events through a flexible response regardless of when or where the event occurs. The most important element of training is mock drills that are conducted to test whether the EMP works as anticipated. The severity of the hazard is based on room size, type of chemical, and volume of material released. The RACE approach to hazardous materials incidents should be followed. Security personnel will decide whether the facility should be evacuated. Security officers must plan for crowd control, directing the flow of casualties and vehicles, and preventing unauthorized entry to decontamination and treatment areas. An effective communication system must be in place to keep the employees and public informed. Planning, preparation, and communication will to a disaster improve the laboratory’s response if and when it occurs.

Citation: Medvescek P, Sewell D. 2004. Emergency Management, p 473-490. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch27

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Figures

Image of APPENDIX 27.2 Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Checklist
APPENDIX 27.2 Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Checklist

Citation: Medvescek P, Sewell D. 2004. Emergency Management, p 473-490. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch27
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Image of APPENDIX 27.3 Operating Status Report Form
APPENDIX 27.3 Operating Status Report Form

Citation: Medvescek P, Sewell D. 2004. Emergency Management, p 473-490. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch27
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Image of APPENDIX 27.8 Patient Locator Information Form
APPENDIX 27.8 Patient Locator Information Form

Citation: Medvescek P, Sewell D. 2004. Emergency Management, p 473-490. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch27
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Image of APPENDIX 27.9 Radioactive Spill Report
APPENDIX 27.9 Radioactive Spill Report

Citation: Medvescek P, Sewell D. 2004. Emergency Management, p 473-490. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch27
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Image of APPENDIX 27.10 Bomb Threat Checklist
APPENDIX 27.10 Bomb Threat Checklist

Citation: Medvescek P, Sewell D. 2004. Emergency Management, p 473-490. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch27
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References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817695.chap27
1.CollegeofAmericanPathologists. 2002. Laboratory Accreditation Program, General Laboratory Checklist, August. College of American Pathologists, Northfield, Ill..
2. Gilchrist, M. J. R.,, W. P. Mckinney,, J. M. Miller,, and A. S. Weissfeld,. 2000. Cumitech 33, Laboratory Safety, Management, and Diagnosis of Biological Agents Associated with Bioterrorism. Coordinating ed., J.W. Snyder. ASM Press, Washington, D.C..
3.Joint Commission for the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. 2000. Standards for Accreditation, Laboratory Services, October. Oakbrook Terrace, Ill..
4. Londorf, D. 1995. Hospital application of the incident management system. Prehosp. Disaster Med. 10:184188.
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9. Snyder, J.W. 2003. Role of the hospital-based microbiology laboratory in preparation for and response to a bioterrorism event. J. Clin. Microbiol. 41:14.
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11. Tweedy, J. T. 1997. Emergency planning and fire safety, p. 121 157. Healthcare Hazard Control and Safety Management. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Fla..
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15.Webster’s American College Dictionary. 1998. Random House, New York, N.Y..

Tables

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Table 27.1

Elements of emergency planning

Citation: Medvescek P, Sewell D. 2004. Emergency Management, p 473-490. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch27
Generic image for table
Table 27.2

External and internal disasters and impact on the laboratory

Citation: Medvescek P, Sewell D. 2004. Emergency Management, p 473-490. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch27
Generic image for table
Table 27.3

Elements of a laboratory EMP

Citation: Medvescek P, Sewell D. 2004. Emergency Management, p 473-490. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch27
Generic image for table
APPENDIX 27.4 Damage Assessment Charta

Adapted from reference .

Citation: Medvescek P, Sewell D. 2004. Emergency Management, p 473-490. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch27
Generic image for table
APPENDIX 27.5 Rapid Evaluation Safety Assessment Forma

Adapted from reference .

Citation: Medvescek P, Sewell D. 2004. Emergency Management, p 473-490. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch27
Generic image for table
APPENDIX 27.6 Safety Considerations for Fixed Equipmenta

Adapted from reference .

Citation: Medvescek P, Sewell D. 2004. Emergency Management, p 473-490. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch27
Generic image for table
APPENDIX 27.7 Equipment Checklista

Adapted from reference .

Citation: Medvescek P, Sewell D. 2004. Emergency Management, p 473-490. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch27

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