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Chapter 49 : Current Trends in Instrumentation and Technology: Outlook for the Future

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Abstract:

This chapter examines current trends in instrumentation and technology in key disciplines in the clinical laboratory. It talks about the physical organization of the clinical laboratory, and discusses the exploration of the current trends in instrumentation and technology in key laboratory disciplines and how these trends can forebode the future. Besides chemiluminescence, the resolving power of time-resolved fluorescence coupled with the relative absence of competing fluorescent interfering substances has provided the impetus for the development of time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay instrumentation. Hematology analyzers exploiting the unique design features of each of their instrumentations are constantly adding more tests. The mainstay of many routine coagulation laboratories is still the global tests, such as the prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). With the instrumentation being able to perform these tests rapidly, in addition to tests such as fibrinogen and thrombin time, the menu of automated tests is constantly increasing. The ability to perform tests at the bedside, rapidly diagnose an infection, and determine appropriate therapy based on the antibiotic susceptibility testing and gene expression profile has the potential to dramatically bring down the need for hospital stays and thus significantly reduce healthcare costs.

Citation: Narayanan S. 2004. Current Trends in Instrumentation and Technology: Outlook for the Future, p 792-807. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch49

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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 49.1

Ultrasensitive immunoassay techniques

Citation: Narayanan S. 2004. Current Trends in Instrumentation and Technology: Outlook for the Future, p 792-807. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch49
Generic image for table
Table 49.2

Principles and features of automated hematology analyzers

Citation: Narayanan S. 2004. Current Trends in Instrumentation and Technology: Outlook for the Future, p 792-807. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch49
Generic image for table
Table 49.3

Features of POC coagulation analyzers

Citation: Narayanan S. 2004. Current Trends in Instrumentation and Technology: Outlook for the Future, p 792-807. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch49
Generic image for table
Table 49.4

Features of automated microbiology instruments

Citation: Narayanan S. 2004. Current Trends in Instrumentation and Technology: Outlook for the Future, p 792-807. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch49
Generic image for table
Table 49.5

Molecular methods for bacterial and viral detection

Citation: Narayanan S. 2004. Current Trends in Instrumentation and Technology: Outlook for the Future, p 792-807. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch49
Generic image for table
Table 49.6

Next-generation technologies for clinical laboratory diagnostic applications

Citation: Narayanan S. 2004. Current Trends in Instrumentation and Technology: Outlook for the Future, p 792-807. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch49

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