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Chapter 8 : Leadership Styles

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Leadership Styles, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

This chapter explores some ranges of leadership style and suggests the elements of leadership style that a leader can learn to command. The different effects of different leadership styles arise from the complex of needs and potentials of people. It presents the leadership simulations that follow to illustrate some of the ways that the leadership style of the senior managers can affect the quality of performance in the organization. The Jorg Junior scenario illustrates several issues for an authority figure facing a problem that looks like a difficulty in enforcing standards. First, the authority figure can intervene for purposes of mobilizing management and employees in tackling the real issue underlying the difficulty in enforcing standards. Second, by analyzing the organization’s response to the last intervention, the authority figure might get clues to what next intervention could be effective for mobilizing management and employees to tackle the real issue. Third, ideally the junior manager would own the standard in a way that the employees would not see the junior manager as merely the puppet of upper management. The chapter suggests that both manager and subordinate have an opportunity for leadership, that is, opportunity for mobilizing the employees to tackle the tough problems of the organization.

Citation: Sinder R, Williams D. 2004. Leadership Styles, p 195-210. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch8

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References

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1. Butler, D.,, and F. L. Geis. 1990. Nonverbal affect responses to male and female leaders: implications for leadership evaluations. J. Pers. Soc. Psychol. 58:4859.
2. Garletts, J. A. 2002. Using career ladders to motivate and retain employees: an implementation success story. Clin. Leadersh. Manag. Rev. 16:380385.
3.Houghton Mifflin. 1992. The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 3rd ed. Houghton Mifflin, Boston, Mass.
4. Pickett, R. B. 2001.What does all of this leadership stuff mean to me? Clin. Leadersh. Manag. Rev. 15:395400.
5. Redgrave, C. 1996. Michael Redgrave:my father. Trafalgar Square Press, London, United Kingdom.
6. Summers, J.,, and M. Nowicki. 2002. Management in action: granting exceptions to rules and policies: management issues and ethical guidelines. Clin. Leadersh. Manag. Rev. 16:336338.
7. Walker, C. A. 2003. Management in action: saving your rookie managers from themselves. Clin. Leadersh. Manag. Rev. 17:115119.

Tables

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APPENDIX 8.1 Comparison of Old Style with New Style of Leadership

Citation: Sinder R, Williams D. 2004. Leadership Styles, p 195-210. In Garcia L, Baselski V, Burke M, Schwab D, Sewell D, Steele J, Weissfeld A, Wilkinson D, Winn W (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817695.ch8

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