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Section 2 : Indigenous and Pathogenic Microbes of Humans

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Indigenous and Pathogenic Microbes of Humans, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

This section talks about indigenous and pathogenic microbes of humans. Humans are exposed to microbes at birth, which leads to one of three outcomes: transient colonization, persistent colonization, or pathogenic interaction. The majority of organisms is unable to become established on the skin or mucosal surfaces and is considered an insignificant finding when recovered in clinical specimens. The section has a table that lists the organisms most commonly recovered from the body surfaces of healthy individuals, and serves as an interpretive guideline for cultured specimens. Most diseases in humans are caused by infections with endogenous bacteria and yeasts or exposure to opportunistic moulds, parasites, and viruses. However, some interactions between microbes and humans commonly lead to disease. The most common microbes responsible for human disease are summarized in the section. Arthropods, parasites in their own right, can serve as vectors for human disease. A listing of the most common arthropod vectors and their associated diseases is also included. The section includes two other tables which list fungi and parasites isolated from humans and their geographic distribution.

Citation: Murray P, Shea Y. 2004. Indigenous and Pathogenic Microbes of Humans, p 21-85. In Pocket Guide to Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817725.ch2
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Tables

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Table 2.1

Human indigenous flora a

Citation: Murray P, Shea Y. 2004. Indigenous and Pathogenic Microbes of Humans, p 21-85. In Pocket Guide to Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817725.ch2
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Table 2.2

Arthropod vectors of medically important diseases a

Citation: Murray P, Shea Y. 2004. Indigenous and Pathogenic Microbes of Humans, p 21-85. In Pocket Guide to Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817725.ch2
Generic image for table
Table 2.3

Fungal pathogens and geographic distribution

Citation: Murray P, Shea Y. 2004. Indigenous and Pathogenic Microbes of Humans, p 21-85. In Pocket Guide to Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817725.ch2
Generic image for table
Table 2.4

Parasitic pathogens and geographic distribution

Citation: Murray P, Shea Y. 2004. Indigenous and Pathogenic Microbes of Humans, p 21-85. In Pocket Guide to Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817725.ch2

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