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Chapter 18 : Why Are Genes Lost? Why Do Genes Persist?

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Why Are Genes Lost? Why Do Genes Persist?, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Gene inactivation and deletion are just as important to genome evolution as are duplication and other mutational events. The environment and phenotype (delivered by accessory gene sequences) act selectively in concert to enable to diversify both ecologically and genetically. Having strategies for acquiring genetic information of all sorts of sizes is helpful to cells in rapidly adapting to new environmental niches. If sequences provide selective advantage to the cell then the genes become established and persist. When a cell has ceased to grow in what is considered a normal way, in nature or in laboratory experiments, it then is posed as a serious physiological problem. The types of species present describe the ecological state of the biofilm; for example, anaerobes to the bottom and aerobes to the top. A biofilm is an organized structure, and quorum sensing is involved. As in many microbiological investigations, the advent of easy sequencing, the applications of bioinformatic analysis, and array technology are going to make a huge contribution to one's understanding of microbial interactions. Group activities are effectively promoted by interactions between different species and genera.

Citation: Day M, Miller R. 2004. Why Are Genes Lost? Why Do Genes Persist?, p 290-294. In Miller R, Day M (ed), Microbial Evolution. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817749.ch18

Key Concept Ranking

Mobile Genetic Elements
0.6407225
Quorum Sensing
0.4091348
0.6407225
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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Interactions in a developing biofilm community. Events occurring are predation, quorum sensing, syntrophy, gene exchange, antagonisms, cheating, nutrient uptake, excretion, etc.

Citation: Day M, Miller R. 2004. Why Are Genes Lost? Why Do Genes Persist?, p 290-294. In Miller R, Day M (ed), Microbial Evolution. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817749.ch18
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Summary of possible inter- and intracellular interactions.

Citation: Day M, Miller R. 2004. Why Are Genes Lost? Why Do Genes Persist?, p 290-294. In Miller R, Day M (ed), Microbial Evolution. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817749.ch18
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

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1. Davies, D. G.,, M. R. Parsek,, J. P. Pearson,, B. H. Iglewski,, J. W. Costerton,, and E. P. Greenberg. 1998. The involvement of cell-to-cell signals in the development of a bacterial biofilm. Science 280:226227.
2. Hallet, B. 2001. Playing Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: combined mechanisms of phase variation in bacteria. Curr. Opin. Microbiol. 4:570581.
3. Kaper, J. B. 1998. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Curr. Opin. Microbiol. 1:103108.
4. Mira, A.,, L. Klasson,, and S. G. E. Andersson. 2002. Microbial genome evolution: sources of variability. Curr. Opin. Microbiol. 5:506512.

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