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Chapter 23 : Mapping Microbial Biodiversity Case Study: The Yellowstone National Park Microbial Database and Map Server

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Mapping Microbial Biodiversity Case Study: The Yellowstone National Park Microbial Database and Map Server, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Geographic information system (GIS) is a research tool that can be used for fundamental research into microbial biodiversity and ecology, biogeography, biogeochemistry, new product discovery, and to support resource management and environmental restoration activities. Internet-accessible GIS applications provide a formal means to catalog microbiological data and facilitate acquisition and distribution of information. A prototype system, Yellowstone National Park (YNP) Microbial Database and Map Server, represents a first application of an Internet-accessible GIS for microbial ecology and diversity. The relational database was constructed using Microsoft Access and linked to spatial data using ESRI Arc Internet Map Server software. The data compiled include base maps, thermal spring survey data from YNP, microbiological and geochemical data acquired from technical publications, and pictures. The YNP prototype system architecture includes geochemical, physical, general field data, and photos of the sampling areas. Geochemical data included in the data table represent the range of ionic and elemental species as well as organic and inorganic compounds that investigators have detected at the various locations throughout the park, as well as the general spring types that are present, e.g., acid sulfate, neutral chloride, calcium carbonate. General information and field data allow for the inclusion of time and date of sample collection or in situ measurement, the type of sample collected, ambient temperature, sample or in situ temperature, and specific comments pertaining to the acquisition or processing of the samples, e.g., pump sampling, grab sampling, or filtration.

Citation: Stoner D, Lee R, Rope R, White L. 2004. Mapping Microbial Biodiversity Case Study: The Yellowstone National Park Microbial Database and Map Server, p 232-236. In Bull A (ed), Microbial Diversity and Bioprospecting. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817770.ch23

Key Concept Ranking

Microbial Ecology
1.1410946
Microbial Diversity
0.7423819
Inorganic Compounds
0.5951455
Calcium Carbonate
0.59149665
Chemicals
0.50846356
Sequence Analysis
0.41926545
Spring
0.4140477
1.1410946
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Figures

Image of Figure 1
Figure 1

Relational data tables are linked to each other via common attributes. Depicted is a subset of the data tables from the prototype system, which shows the linking of various tables via common identification numbers.

Citation: Stoner D, Lee R, Rope R, White L. 2004. Mapping Microbial Biodiversity Case Study: The Yellowstone National Park Microbial Database and Map Server, p 232-236. In Bull A (ed), Microbial Diversity and Bioprospecting. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817770.ch23
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Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

Each site has a summary data table that can be accessed through a link associated with the site. Information included are the average, high, and low values for pH, temperature, and conductivity for the spring as well as the species and strains that have been detected at the site.

Citation: Stoner D, Lee R, Rope R, White L. 2004. Mapping Microbial Biodiversity Case Study: The Yellowstone National Park Microbial Database and Map Server, p 232-236. In Bull A (ed), Microbial Diversity and Bioprospecting. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817770.ch23
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Download as Powerpoint

References

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1. Kistemann, T.,, F. Dangendorf,, and M. Exner. 2001. A Geographical Information System (GIS) as a tool for microbial risk assessment in catchment areas of drinking water reservoirs. Int. J. Hyg. Environ. Health 203:225233.
2. Reysenbach, A.-L.,, G. S. Wickham,, and N. R. Pace. 1994. Phylogenetic analysis of the hyperthermophilic pink filament community in Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 60:21132119.
3. Shiea, J.,, S. C. Brassell,, and D. M. Ward. 1991. Comparative analysis of free lipids in hot spring cyanobacterial and photosynthetic bacterial mats and their component photosynthetic bacteria. Org. Geochem. 17:309319.
4. Stahl, D. A.,, D. J. Lane,, G. J. Olsen,, and N. R. Pace. 1985. Characterization of a Yellowstone Hot Spring Microbial Community by 5S rRNA sequences. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 49:13791384.
5. Stoner, D. L.,, N. S. Burbank,, and K. S. Miller. 1994. Anaerobic transformation of organosulfur compounds in microbial mats from Octopus Spring. Geomicrobiol. J. 12:195202.
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7. Strittholt, J. R.,, R. J. Garono,, and P. A. Frost. 1998. Spatial Patterns in Land Use and Water Quality in the Tillamook Bay Watershed: a GIS Mapping Project, http://www.earthdesign.com/caforpt/report4b.html.
8. Tayne, T. A.,, J. E. Cutler,, and D. M. Ward. 1987. Use of Chloroflexus-specific antiserum to evaluate filamentous bacteria of a hot spring microbial mat. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 53:19621964.
9. Zeikus, J. G.,, P. W. Hegge,, and J. B. Andersen. 1979. Thermoanaerobium brockii gen. nov. and sp. nov., a new chemoorganotrophic, caldoactive, anaerobic bacterium. Arch. Microbiol. 122:4148.
10. Zelicoff, A. P.,, J. Brillman,, D. W. Forslund,, J. E. George,, S. Zink,, S. Koenig,, T. Staab,, G. Simpson,, E. Umland,, K. Bersell,, R. M. Salerno,, and G. Mann. 2001. The Rapid Syndrome Validation Project (RSVP) SAND No. 2001-2754J. Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, Calif.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1

Data types used in GIS

Citation: Stoner D, Lee R, Rope R, White L. 2004. Mapping Microbial Biodiversity Case Study: The Yellowstone National Park Microbial Database and Map Server, p 232-236. In Bull A (ed), Microbial Diversity and Bioprospecting. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817770.ch23

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