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Chapter 43 : Natural Products Research Partnerships with Multiple Objectives in Global Biodiversity Hot Spots: Nine Years of the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups Program

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Natural Products Research Partnerships with Multiple Objectives in Global Biodiversity Hot Spots: Nine Years of the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups Program, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

The International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups (ICBGs) have been among the most ambitious bioprospecting endeavors because of the explicit intent to use the drug discovery and bioinventory research process to generate enhanced research capacity, opportunities for sustainable economic activity, and incentives for conservation at each host site. Specifically, they must include substantial and novel efforts in natural products drug discovery, biological inventory, research capacity building, and benefit sharing. The major focus of bioinventory activity to date has been terrestrial plants. Several types of ICBG activities promote conservation and development. They include training personnel and research capacity enhancement at host country institutions, scientific research in support of biodiversity management, in situ and ex situ conservation projects, environmental education, and policy analysis. These are described in detail in this chapter. The chapter also describes a few illustrative examples among the many supported by the ICBG program. In summary, in the first 9 years of the program, the ICBGs have (i) discovered numerous bioactive compounds, some of which are leads of significant continuing interest; (ii) enhanced the technical capacity of over 2,000 developing country participants and their associated institutions; (iii) contributed to the scientific and policy process of conservation; and (iv) provided important models for governments and other organizations for collaborative research that supports multiple objectives, including those of the CBD. The ICBG has pioneered the development of models for nontraditional international partnerships of universities, companies, and government and community organizations.

Citation: Rosenthal J, Katz F. 2004. Natural Products Research Partnerships with Multiple Objectives in Global Biodiversity Hot Spots: Nine Years of the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups Program, p 458-466. In Bull A (ed), Microbial Diversity and Bioprospecting. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817770.ch43

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Tables

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Table 1

ICBG program summaries

Citation: Rosenthal J, Katz F. 2004. Natural Products Research Partnerships with Multiple Objectives in Global Biodiversity Hot Spots: Nine Years of the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups Program, p 458-466. In Bull A (ed), Microbial Diversity and Bioprospecting. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817770.ch43

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