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Chapter 5 : Emerging Concepts in Bacterial Adhesion and Its Consequences

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Abstract:

It is becoming more and more evident that adhesins can exhibit biological functions other than bacterial adhesion but that may nevertheless play a crucial role in the infectious process. The concept that adhesins can have pathogenic activities other than in bacterial adhesion are illustrated by the proinflammatory properties of lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Because some of the additional biological functions are postulated to be directly related to the development of disease, it is expected that therapies based on neutralizing these functions would protect at multiple levels. Inhibition of adhesion by oligosaccharides and simple sugars continues to be a major method of identifying lectin adhesins and characterizing receptor specificities. The interaction of bacteria with phagocytic cells has been extensively studied, and the role of this interaction in host defense has been well documented. In the last decade, increased interest has been focused on mast cells, immune cells that are best known for their role in allergy and that have never previously been implicated in interactions with bacterial targets. The concept that bacterial clones are capable of producing multiple adhesins was established a number of years ago. Recent studies have not only confirmed this concept but have also shown that it is even more extensive than previously thought.

Citation: Ofek I, Hasty D, Doyle R. 2003. Emerging Concepts in Bacterial Adhesion and Its Consequences, p 97-100. In Bacterial Adhesion to Animal Cells and Tissues. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817800.ch5

Key Concept Ranking

Bacterial Pathogenesis
0.62768716
Cell Wall Components
0.55188835
Bacterial Adhesion
0.5351644
Phagocytic Cells
0.50435734
Mast Cells
0.49805287
Immune Systems
0.48539102
0.62768716
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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE 5.1

Selected common themes in the field of bacterial adhesion

Citation: Ofek I, Hasty D, Doyle R. 2003. Emerging Concepts in Bacterial Adhesion and Its Consequences, p 97-100. In Bacterial Adhesion to Animal Cells and Tissues. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817800.ch5
Generic image for table
TABLE 5.2

Examples of biological functions of adhesins in infections other than mediating adhesion

Citation: Ofek I, Hasty D, Doyle R. 2003. Emerging Concepts in Bacterial Adhesion and Its Consequences, p 97-100. In Bacterial Adhesion to Animal Cells and Tissues. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817800.ch5

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