1887

Chapter 14 : Fungi

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $7.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Fungi, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817855/9781555812645_Chap14-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817855/9781555812645_Chap14-2.gif

Abstract:

In real life, more complex multicellular microbes also play major roles, for example in the chemistry of the environment and as pathogenic (disease-producing) agents. Fungi (singular, fungus) are particularly significant. They are eukaryotes and can be classified as follows: microscopic, and macroscopic (multicellular). Two basic features are common to multicellular microfungi: (i) under the microscope, cells are observed to occur in the form of threadlike filaments that often have branches, and (ii) the filamentous cell masses produce special reproductive structures that shed spores in great abundance. These features are illustrated by the scanning electron micrograph of the mould Penicillium shown in this chapter. Fungi are commonly observed growing in colorful patches on tree trunks or barren materials such as bare rocks and house roofs. A number of fungi are pathogenic for animals and plants. Fungal infections of humans and other animals are usually called mycoses. Important examples include thrush, diaper rash, vaginitis, and the lung diseases coccidioidomycosis (caused by Coccidioides immitis) and histoplasmosis (Histoplasma capsulatum). The ability of many fungi to grow on materials of low nutrient content explains why they frequently accumulate in buildings, causing nasal and eye irritation or respiratory distress to many people. As viewed under the microscope, Phytophthora infestans shows the typical features of eukaryotic microscopic fungi. Owing to an obscure technicality, it is now frequently referred to as "fungus-like". Leaf-cutter ants in tropical forests apparently invented agriculture long before humans did.

Citation: Gest H. 2003. Fungi, p 90-94. In Microbes. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817855.ch14
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of Untitled
Untitled

Citation: Gest H. 2003. Fungi, p 90-94. In Microbes. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817855.ch14
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 21
Figure 21

Scanning electron micrograph of Penicillium roqueforti, the blue mould used in the manufacture of roquefort cheese. Note the resemblance of the fruiting body (bearing chains of spores, or conidia) to a paint brush. The Latin for “paint brush” is penicillus.

Citation: Gest H. 2003. Fungi, p 90-94. In Microbes. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817855.ch14
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817855.chap14

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error