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Chapter 31 : Biofilm Formation and Multiplication of on Synthetic Pipe Materials in Contact with Treated Water under Static and Dynamic Conditions

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Biofilm Formation and Multiplication of on Synthetic Pipe Materials in Contact with Treated Water under Static and Dynamic Conditions, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

The growth-promoting properties of 10 selected synthetic materials, as well as copper and stainless steel, were tested in static (batch) experiments at 25°C and also in a dynamic (flowthrough) test at ambient temperature simulating flow conditions in a household plumbing system. The study objectives were (i) to compare the microbial growth-promoting properties of various synthetic materials with those of copper and stainless steel under static and dynamic test conditions, (ii) to determine the effect of the materials on the multiplication of , and (iii) to evaluate the materials on the basis of the obtained results. The growth potential (LegGP) (CFU/cm) of the materials in the biomass production potential (BPP) test was calculated from the concentrations of in water and in biofilm after 56, 84, and 112 days of incubation of the flasks with the material samples. The results of the static test reveal that materials may affect biofilm formation at long periods of stagnation and a temperature of 25°C. However, in practice also, water contributes to biofilm formation. Data about biofilm concentrations and in plumbing systems are needed to enable a quantitative evaluation of the BPP and biofilm formation potential (BFP) values as observed for the various materials in the static test.

Citation: van der Kooij D, Veenendaal H, Slaats N, Vonk D. 2002. Biofilm Formation and Multiplication of on Synthetic Pipe Materials in Contact with Treated Water under Static and Dynamic Conditions, p 176-180. In Marre R, Abu Kwaik Y, Bartlett C, Cianciotto N, Fields B, Frosch M, Hacker J, Lück P (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817985.ch31

Key Concept Ranking

Adenosine Triphosphate
0.5192308
River Water
0.46891212
Legionella
0.45154482
0.5192308
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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Attached biomass concentrations (biofilm) as a function of time on various materials incubated in slow sand filtrate at 25°C (static test). Samples were taken in duplicate from one flask. Symbols: ○, glass; □, stainless steel; ■, PVC-C; ●·, PP; ▲, PE-Xa.

Citation: van der Kooij D, Veenendaal H, Slaats N, Vonk D. 2002. Biofilm Formation and Multiplication of on Synthetic Pipe Materials in Contact with Treated Water under Static and Dynamic Conditions, p 176-180. In Marre R, Abu Kwaik Y, Bartlett C, Cianciotto N, Fields B, Frosch M, Hacker J, Lück P (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817985.ch31
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Biomass production potential (pg of ATP/cm) values (with upper limit of the standard deviation) of the selected materials calculated from the biomass concentrations on samples (in duplicate) of the materials and in the water on days 56, 84, and 112. BPP is the sum of the biofilm formation potential (BFP) and the suspended biomass production (SBP); see text. Materials: 1, 2, 3, glass; 4, 5, 6, SS; 7, PVC-C; 8, PB; 9, PVC-C; 10, copper; 11, PP; 12, PE-Xc; 13, copper; 14, PP; 15, PB; 16, PE-Xc; 17, SIL; 18, 19, PE-Xa; 20, SIL; 21, PE-Xb; 22, SIL.

Citation: van der Kooij D, Veenendaal H, Slaats N, Vonk D. 2002. Biofilm Formation and Multiplication of on Synthetic Pipe Materials in Contact with Treated Water under Static and Dynamic Conditions, p 176-180. In Marre R, Abu Kwaik Y, Bartlett C, Cianciotto N, Fields B, Frosch M, Hacker J, Lück P (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817985.ch31
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Image of FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3

LegGP (CFU/cm) of selected materials tested at 25°C in the static test, calculated from the concentrations on material pieces and in the water on days 56, 84, and 112; see text. The upper limit of the standard deviation is indicated. The open segments of the columns represent the fraction of suspended , the filled part represents attached growth. Materials: 1, 2, glass; 3, PVC-C; 4, SS; 5, glass; 6, PE-Xa; 7, Sil; 8, SS; 9, copper; 10, SS; 11, PE-Xc; 12, Sil; 13, copper; 14, PP; 15, PB; 16, PVC-C; 17, PE-Xc; 18, PB; 19, PP; 20, Sil; 21, PE-Xa; 22, PE-Xb.

Citation: van der Kooij D, Veenendaal H, Slaats N, Vonk D. 2002. Biofilm Formation and Multiplication of on Synthetic Pipe Materials in Contact with Treated Water under Static and Dynamic Conditions, p 176-180. In Marre R, Abu Kwaik Y, Bartlett C, Cianciotto N, Fields B, Frosch M, Hacker J, Lück P (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817985.ch31
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Image of FIGURE 4
FIGURE 4

Relationship between BPP and the LegGP in the batch test at 25°C. Black dots, glass controls. The relationship is given by log (LegGP) = 0.81 log BPP + 1.1 (r = 0.48; 0.01).

Citation: van der Kooij D, Veenendaal H, Slaats N, Vonk D. 2002. Biofilm Formation and Multiplication of on Synthetic Pipe Materials in Contact with Treated Water under Static and Dynamic Conditions, p 176-180. In Marre R, Abu Kwaik Y, Bartlett C, Cianciotto N, Fields B, Frosch M, Hacker J, Lück P (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817985.ch31
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References

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1. Colbourne, J. S.,, D. J. Pratt,., M. G. Smith,, S. P. Fisher-Hoch,, and D. Harper. 1984. Water fittings as sources of Legionella pneumophila in a hospital plumbing system. Lancet i:210213.
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3. Kwaik, Y. A.,, L. Y. Gao,, B.J. Stone,, C. Venkataraman,, and O. S. Harb. 1998. Invasion of protozoa by Legionella pneumophila and its role in bacterial ecology and pathogenesis. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:31273133.
4. Rogers, J.,, A. B. Dowsett,, P. J. Dennis,, and C. W. Keevil. 1994. Influence of plumbing materials on biofilm formation and growth of Legionella pneumophila in potable water systems. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 60:18421851.
5. Rowbotham, T.J. 1980. Preliminary report on the pathogenicity of Legionella pneumophila for freshwater and soil amoeba. J. Clin. Pathol. 33: 11791183.
6. Schoenen, D.,, R. Schulze-Robbecke,, and N. Schirdewahn. 1988. Microbial contamination of water by materials of pipes and hoses. 2nd communication: growth of Legionella pneumophila. Zentralbl. Bakteriol. Hyg. B186:326332.
7. Van der Kooij, D.,, and H. R. Veenendaal. 1993. Assessment of the biofilm formation potential of synthetic materials in contact with drinking water during distribution, p. 13951407. In Proc. AWWA Wat. Qual. Technol. Conf. American Water Works Association, Denver, Colo.
8. Van der Kooij, D.,, H. R. Veenendaal,, C. Baars-Lorist,, D. W. van der Klift,, and Y. C. Drost. 1995. Biofilm formation on surfaces of glass and teflon exposed to treated water. Water Res. 29:16551662.

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