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Chapter 7 : Resistance of to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides

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Resistance of to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMP) form an important part of the innate immune response in many organisms ranging from humans to amoebae. The fact that CAMP resistance mechanisms exist in is suggested by several lines of evidence. Investigations were undertaken to investigate the role of the -like gene in in CAMP resistance and intracellular infections. To investigate the role of the -like gene in CAMP resistance, the MICs of PmB, a bacterially derived CAMP, and C18G, a synthetic CAMP based on human platelet activating factor IV, were assessed for the mutants generated. Consequently, bacterial growth in low Mg minimal media increases the CAMP resistance generated by . CAMP resistance to PmB or C18G was increased by growth in low-Mg CDM in both 130b and NU260. Thus, there was no obvious defect in the initial stages of infection, i.e., attachment and invasion. Intracellular growth of both wild type and mutant was also tested in a coculture assay with . This amoeba is known to support the growth of and was isolated from a clinical case of legionellosis.

Citation: Robey M, O'Connell W, Cianciotto N. 2002. Resistance of to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides, p 38-42. In Marre R, Abu Kwaik Y, Bartlett C, Cianciotto N, Fields B, Frosch M, Hacker J, Lück P (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817985.ch7

Key Concept Ranking

Salmonella enterica
0.6217844
Legionella pneumophila
0.6054216
0.6217844
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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Intracellular infection with strains. (A) U937 cell monolayers (n = 3) were infected at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1 with strain 130b (●) and NU260 (□). Asterisks indicate significant differences (P < 0.01; Student's test) in numbers of recovered bacteria between 130b and NU260. (B) Monolayers of amoebae = 3) were infected with wild-type 130b (●) and mutant NU260 (□) at an MOI of 0.01. Asterisks indicate significant differences 0.05 at 48 h or 0.005 at 72 h; Student's test). Comparable results were obtained in triplicate experiments, and the data presented here are from one representative experiment.

Citation: Robey M, O'Connell W, Cianciotto N. 2002. Resistance of to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides, p 38-42. In Marre R, Abu Kwaik Y, Bartlett C, Cianciotto N, Fields B, Frosch M, Hacker J, Lück P (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817985.ch7
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Growth of strains in low-Mg liquid medium. Wild-type strain 130b (●) and mutant NU260 (□) were compared for growth in CDM (A), and CDM with 0.005 mM Mg cations (B). Growth was assessed by measuring the optical density at 660 nm of triplicate cultures at various times of incubation. Asterisks indicate significant (P < 0.05; Student's test) differences between the 130b and NU260 cultures. Standard deviations are shown, but the error bars are too small to be observed in panels A and B. This experiment was performed in triplicate with comparable results and representative data are presented here.

Citation: Robey M, O'Connell W, Cianciotto N. 2002. Resistance of to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides, p 38-42. In Marre R, Abu Kwaik Y, Bartlett C, Cianciotto N, Fields B, Frosch M, Hacker J, Lück P (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817985.ch7
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References

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1. Bishop, R. E.,, H. S. Gibbons,, T. Guina,, M. S. Trent,, S. I. Miller,, and C. R. Raetz. 2000. Transfer of palmitate from phospholipids to lipid A in outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. EMBO J. 19:50715080.
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Tables

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TABLE 1

CAMP susceptibility of strains

Citation: Robey M, O'Connell W, Cianciotto N. 2002. Resistance of to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides, p 38-42. In Marre R, Abu Kwaik Y, Bartlett C, Cianciotto N, Fields B, Frosch M, Hacker J, Lück P (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817985.ch7

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