1887

Chapter 7 : Introduction to Part II

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $30.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Introduction to Part II, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555818012/9781555812027_Chap07-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555818012/9781555812027_Chap07-2.gif

Abstract:

This chapter provides an introduction to "Immunopathology and Immunity". The manifestations of immunity in a living animal are expressed as variations on the theme of inflammation, directed by reaction of antibody or T cells with antigen in vivo. The terms “immunity” and “allergy” are now generally reserved for effects mediated through immune mechanisms, whereas “hypersensitivity” has a less precise meaning. Some instances of altered reactivity as a result of a previous exposure are not mediated by immune mechanisms. How immune mechanisms protect (immunity) and attack (immunopathology) a person is the subject of this part of the book. In the systemic study of disease, pathogenic changes are classified according to their anatomic location. The classification of immune effector mechanisms used in this book includes seven general categories: inactivation or activation, cytotoxic, Arthus (immune complex), anaphylactic, cell-mediated cytotoxicity, delayed-type hypersensitivity, and granulomatous. These effector mechanisms are activated by the reaction of antibody or sensitized cells with antigens in vivo. The major mechanism of tissue damage in delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions is the phagocytosis and destruction of cells by macrophages. Immunity is a double-edged sword that cuts down the enemies with one edge and causes disease with the other. Some examples of the protective and destructive effects of immune effector mechanisms are listed in this chapter. In this part, immune diseases are presented according to the predominant immune effector mechanism.

Citation: Sell S. 2001. Introduction to Part II, p 235-239. In Immunology, Immunopathology, and Immunity, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818012.ch7
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of Figure 7.1
Figure 7.1

Stages of immune reactions. Primary reactions refer to binding of antigen to antibodies or cells; secondary reactions refer to various phenomena that can be measured in vitro; tertiary reactions are seen when immune effector mechanisms are activated in vivo.

Citation: Sell S. 2001. Introduction to Part II, p 235-239. In Immunology, Immunopathology, and Immunity, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818012.ch7
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555818012.chap7
1. Criep, L. H. 1962. Clinical Immunology and Allergy. Grune and Stratton, New York, N.Y.
2. Gell, P. G. H.,, and R. R. A. Coombs. 1963. Clinical Aspects of Immunology, 1st ed. Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, England.
3. Raffel, S. 1953. Immunity, Hypersensitivity, and Serology. Appleton-Century Crofts, New York, N.Y.
4. Roitt, I. M. 1971. Essential Immunology, 1st ed. Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, England.
5. Sell, S. 1972. Immunology, Immunopathology and Immunity. Harper and Row, Hagerstown, Md.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 7.1

Classification of immune effector mechanisms

Citation: Sell S. 2001. Introduction to Part II, p 235-239. In Immunology, Immunopathology, and Immunity, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818012.ch7
Generic image for table
Table 7.2

The “double-edged sword” of immune reactions a

Citation: Sell S. 2001. Introduction to Part II, p 235-239. In Immunology, Immunopathology, and Immunity, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818012.ch7

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error