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Chapter 2 : Biosafety Classification of Livestock and Poultry Animal Pathogens

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Abstract:

This chapter introduces a proposed scheme for use as a reference in placing animal pathogens into biosafety classifications. The importance of an accepted animal disease classification is apparent; however, the universally accepted guidelines for placing pathogens that only infect animals into biosafety risk categories are poorly defined compared with the guidelines for human pathogens. A biosafety classification scheme for animal pathogens is not intended to place undue burden on researchers but to enhance the quality of research and efforts to improve animal health. The natural starting point for proper biosecurity classification of strict animal pathogens is risk assessment. A consensus on animal pathogen risk groups was reached at the 5th International Veterinary Biosafety Workshop in 1996. The emphasis of biosafety risk classification was on pathogens that infect only animals (not affecting human health). Laboratory work allows the containment and control of infectious materials during procedures by utilizing standard laboratory practices and techniques and also specialized primary barrier equipment. Animals (livestock and poultry species) infected with disease agents present unique challenges for biosecurity control.

Citation: Rusk J. 2000. Biosafety Classification of Livestock and Poultry Animal Pathogens, p 13-22. In Brown C, Bolin C (ed), Emerging Diseases of Animals. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818050.ch2

Key Concept Ranking

Foot-and-mouth disease virus
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Animal Pathogens
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References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555818050.chap2
1. Barbeito, M. S.,, G. Abraham,, M. Best,, P. Cairns,, P. Langevin,, W. G. Sterritt,, D. Barr,, W. Meulepas,, J. M. Sanchez-Vizcaino,, M. Saraza,, E. Requena,, M. Collado,, P. Mani,, R. Breeze,, H. Brunner,, C. A. Mebus,, R. L. Morgan,, S. Rusk,, L. M. Siegfried,, and L. H. Thompson. 1995. Recommended biocontainment features for research and diagnostic facilities where animal pathogens are used. Rev. Sci. Tech. Off. Int. Epizoot. 14: 873 887.
2. Best, M. 1996. Mission statement and goals of the International Veterinary Biosafety Work Group. In Proceedings of the 5th International Veterinary Biosafety Workshop.
3. Bridges, V. E. 1998. Risk analysis—an introduction and its application in APHIS:VS, p. 242 247. In Proceedings of the One Hundred and Second Annual Meeting of the United States Animal Health Association. U.S. Animal Health Association, Richmond, Va.
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7. Kahrs, R. F. 1998. Applications of the concept of regionalization to domestic animal disease control and global market expansion, p. 207 211. In Proceedings of the One Hundredth Annual Meeting of the United States Animal Health Association. U.S. Animal Health Association, Little Rock, Ark.
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11. Office of the Federal Register. 1999. Animal and animal products. In Code of Federal Regulations 1999-9 CFR, parts 1-199. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.
12. Pilchard, E. I.,, and H. A. McDaniel. 1983. Foreign diseases and arthropod pests of livestock and poultry, p. 11 23. In Proceedings of the Eighty-Seventh Annual Meeting of the United States Animal Health Association. U.S. Animal Health Association, Richmond, Va.
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18.World Trade Agreement. 1994. General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. World Trade Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.

Tables

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Table 1

CDC-NIH biosafety levels for infectious agents

Citation: Rusk J. 2000. Biosafety Classification of Livestock and Poultry Animal Pathogens, p 13-22. In Brown C, Bolin C (ed), Emerging Diseases of Animals. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818050.ch2
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Table 2

International veterinary biosafety classification of animal pathogens

Citation: Rusk J. 2000. Biosafety Classification of Livestock and Poultry Animal Pathogens, p 13-22. In Brown C, Bolin C (ed), Emerging Diseases of Animals. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818050.ch2
Generic image for table
Table 3

Biosafety matrix for livestock and poultry pathogens

Citation: Rusk J. 2000. Biosafety Classification of Livestock and Poultry Animal Pathogens, p 13-22. In Brown C, Bolin C (ed), Emerging Diseases of Animals. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818050.ch2
Generic image for table
Table 4

Biosecurity definitions for animal pathogens

Citation: Rusk J. 2000. Biosafety Classification of Livestock and Poultry Animal Pathogens, p 13-22. In Brown C, Bolin C (ed), Emerging Diseases of Animals. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818050.ch2

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