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Chapter 8 : Brucellosis in Terrestrial Wildlife and Marine Mammals

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Abstract:

There are currently six named species of plus the newly discovered group of brucellae infecting marine mammals. is primarily a disease of goats and sheep that is present in most areas of the world where goats are raised. In humans, is considered the principal cause of brucellosis and is clinically the most severe. In the United States, disease caused by in animals is considered exotic, and nearly all cases of human infection are due to the consumption of imported unpasteurized goat cheese. Bison migrations outside Yellowstone National Park (YNP) boundaries have occurred with increased frequency since 1980, usually during the winter. When the bison migrate onto private land, they pose a potential threat of spreading brucellosis to domestic cattle, thereby putting the state's class free status at risk. The development of effective strategies to control and eradicate brucellosis from bison and elk in the greater Yellowstone area (GYA), from feral swine across the southern and central states, from reindeer and caribou in the arctic, and perhaps finally from marine mammals presents an unprecedented challenge. With the continuing emergence of this disease and these disease issues in free-ranging populations of wildlife, solutions can only be found based on good science, public education, and innovative, collaborative work between research scientists, regulatory and wildlife veterinarians, and wildlife managers.

Citation: Rhyan J. 2000. Brucellosis in Terrestrial Wildlife and Marine Mammals, p 161-184. In Brown C, Bolin C (ed), Emerging Diseases of Animals. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818050.ch8

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Figures

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Figure 1

Map of the GYA. Courtesy of the National Park Service.

Citation: Rhyan J. 2000. Brucellosis in Terrestrial Wildlife and Marine Mammals, p 161-184. In Brown C, Bolin C (ed), Emerging Diseases of Animals. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818050.ch8
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Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

Placenta of aborted bison fetus from YNP. Note the immunohistochemical staining of brucellae in the trophoblastic epithelium. Immunoperoxidase stain was used. Bar = 100 μm.

Citation: Rhyan J. 2000. Brucellosis in Terrestrial Wildlife and Marine Mammals, p 161-184. In Brown C, Bolin C (ed), Emerging Diseases of Animals. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818050.ch8
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Image of Figure 3
Figure 3

Electron photomicrograph of a developing sp. larva in the uterus of an adult nematode. Note the immunogold labeling of brucellae adjacent to the larva (arrows).

Citation: Rhyan J. 2000. Brucellosis in Terrestrial Wildlife and Marine Mammals, p 161-184. In Brown C, Bolin C (ed), Emerging Diseases of Animals. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818050.ch8
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Figure 4

Cross section through an adult sp. in the lung of a harbor seal. Note the marked immunohistochemical staining of brucellar antigen surrounding gonadal cells and developing larvae, in developing larvae, and in seal leukocytes adjacent to the nematode. Immunoperoxidase stain was used.

Citation: Rhyan J. 2000. Brucellosis in Terrestrial Wildlife and Marine Mammals, p 161-184. In Brown C, Bolin C (ed), Emerging Diseases of Animals. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818050.ch8
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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1

Summary of reported positive serological results on various species of marine mammals

Citation: Rhyan J. 2000. Brucellosis in Terrestrial Wildlife and Marine Mammals, p 161-184. In Brown C, Bolin C (ed), Emerging Diseases of Animals. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818050.ch8
Generic image for table
Table 2

Summary of reported positive culture results on various species of marine mammals

Citation: Rhyan J. 2000. Brucellosis in Terrestrial Wildlife and Marine Mammals, p 161-184. In Brown C, Bolin C (ed), Emerging Diseases of Animals. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818050.ch8

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