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Chapter 2 : Wednesdays

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Wednesdays, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

The author Cynthia A. Needham and her coworkers are all motivated by the same vision—a general public with a high level of scientific literacy, and share the same commitment—one of translating scientific discovery and principles into terms and stories that are intellectually accessible to everyone. The author had the privilege of leading a coalition of organizations known as the Microbial Literacy Collaborative on behalf of the American Society for Microbiology. The goal of the Collaborative was to increase the level of scientific literacy among the members of the general public, with a particular focus on the microbial world. The centerpiece of the initiative's effort is a four-hour documentary broadcast by PBS entitled . The success of the Microbial Literacy Collaborative's initiative is due in large part to the combined energy of talented producers, educators, and scientists. Their insights and advice provided the key link between the leading edges of research and its application and the translation of this highly technical area into accessible language and imagery. Popular media such as television, radio, print, and the Internet provide the opportunity to build a more comprehensive appreciation for both the scientific process and the contemporary scientific basis for understanding complex issues. The success of these media in expanding science literacy will depend, however, on input from the scientific community.

Citation: Needham C. 2000. Wednesdays, p 11-14. In Atlas R (ed), Many Faces, Many Microbes. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818128.ch2

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Infectious Diseases
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Citation: Needham C. 2000. Wednesdays, p 11-14. In Atlas R (ed), Many Faces, Many Microbes. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818128.ch2
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References

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1. Needham, C. A.,, K. A. McPherson,, and K. H. Webb. 1998. Streptococcal pharyngitis: Impact of a high-sensitivity antigen test on physician outcome. J. Clin. Microbiol. 36:34683473.
2. Needham, C. A.,, and P. Hurlbert. 1992. Evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunoassay employing a covalently bound capture antibody for direct detection of herpes simplex virus. J. Clin. Microbiol. 30:531532.
3. Needham, C. A. 1988. Haemophilus influenzae: Antibiotic susceptibility. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 1:218227.
4. Serfass, D. A.,, P. M. Mendelman,, D. O. Chaffin,, and C. A. Needham. 1986. Ampicillin resistance and penicillin-binding proteins of Haemophilus influenzae. J. Gen. Microbiol. 132:28552861.
5. Needham, C. A. 1986. Rapid methods in microbiology for in-office testing. Clin. Lab. Med. 6:291304.
6. Sweeney, K. G.,, A. Verghese,, and C. A. Needham. 1985. In vitro susceptibilities of isolates from patients with Branhamella catarrhalis pneumonia compared with those of colonizing strains. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 27:499502.
7. Needham, C. A.,, and W. Stempsey. 1984. Incidence, adherence, and antibiotic resistance of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species causing human disease. Diagnost. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. 2:293299.

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