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Chapter 22 : Pioneering Molecular Biology

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Pioneering Molecular Biology, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Molecular biology is so young a set of techniques and ideas that a number of current practitioners have lived through its entire development. It was easy to make discoveries and get jobs and grants in those days because everything was wide open and everyone was a raw recruit. It is a source of wistful amusement to think that the author made the first pure preparations of 30S, 50S, and 70S ribosomes from and measured their molecular weights and that his Ph.D. research also included one of the first functional in vitro systems for bacterial protein synthesis. Results that the author obtained with subcellular systems provided some of the indications that RNA was involved in directing protein formation. With his colleagues David Apirion and Giorgio Mangiarotti, the author analyzed the dynamics of ribosome metabolism, facilitating the study with fragile mutants of that could be lysed gently enough to preserve the polysomal structures. As for the author's own work, involvement in discussions for the planning of microbial sequencing initiatives has been accompanied by a more interventive participation in the expansion of human genome approaches.

Citation: Schlessinger D. 2000. Pioneering Molecular Biology, p 174-178. In Atlas R (ed), Many Faces, Many Microbes. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818128.ch22

Key Concept Ranking

Bacterial Proteins
0.82176423
Antibacterial Agents
0.66502714
Messenger RNA
0.61538464
0.82176423
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Citation: Schlessinger D. 2000. Pioneering Molecular Biology, p 174-178. In Atlas R (ed), Many Faces, Many Microbes. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818128.ch22
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References

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1. Pilia, G.,, R. M. Hughes-Benzie,, A. MacKenzie,, P. Baybayan,, E. Y. Chen,, R. Huber,, G. Neri,, A. Cao,, A. Forabosco,, and D. Schlessinger. 1996. Mutations in GPC3, a glypican gene, cause the Simpson-Golabi-Behmel overgrowth syndrome. Nat. Genet. 12:241247.
2. Sirdeshmukh, R.,, and D. Schlessinger. 1985. Why is processing of 23S ribosomal RNA in Escherichia coli not obligate for its function? J. Mol. Biol. 186:669672.
3. Nikolaev, N.,, L. Silengo,, and D. Schlessinger. 1973. A role of RNase III in processing of rRNA and mRNA precursors in Escherichia coli. J. Biol. Chem. 248:79677969.
4. Luzzatto, L.,, D. Apirion,, and D. Schlessinger. 1968. Mechanism of action of streptomycin in Escherichia coli: interruption of the ribosome cycle at the initiation of protein synthesis. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 60:873880.
5. Mangiarotti, G.,, and D. Schlessinger. 1967. Polyribosome metabolism. Formation and lifetime of messenger RNA molecules, ribosomal subunit couples, and polyribosomes. J. Mol. Biol. 29:395418.

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