1887

Chapter 1 : Molecular Phylogeny of and Relatives

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $15.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Molecular Phylogeny of and Relatives, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555818203/9781555811556_Chap01-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555818203/9781555811556_Chap01-2.gif

Abstract:

spp. cause a variety of human and animal diseases and are one of the most prevalent causes of sexually transmitted diseases. By 16S rRNA analysis, chlamydiae fall into one of about 40 "divisions," or main relatedness groups, that make up the bacterial phylogenetic domain. The application of PCR coupled with rRNA-based phylogenetic techniques has resulted in a substantial accumulation of -related sequences. Phylogenetic analyses from several laboratories generally concur in their assessments of the phylogeny of the group. The species are all relatively closely related, yet until recently they have represented an entire bacterial division. Phylogenetic analyses carried out with the RNase P RNA sequences from , , and , the only ones available, support the rRNA tree, showing that and are more closely related to each other than either is to . All known members of the phylogenetic division are intracellular parasites, although it is possible that free-living instances of the division exist in the environment. Members of the and divisions are little-studied organisms that recent molecular studies show to be conspicuous in the environment. Although their relatedness through sequence comparisons is currently ambiguous, an additional similarity between members of these groups and members of is the apparent lack of peptidoglycan in their cell walls. Complete genome sequences of representatives of the and will facilitate a better analysis of their possible specific relationships with the Chlamydiales, and increase knowledge of bacterial division-level diversity.

Citation: Tanner M, Harris J, Pace N. 1999. Molecular Phylogeny of and Relatives, p 1-8. In Stephens R (ed), Chlamydia. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818203.ch1

Key Concept Ranking

16s rRNA Sequencing
0.5250391
0.5250391
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of Figure 1
Figure 1

(A) Diagrammatic dendrogram representing the three domains of life and the phylogenetic position of the with respect to representatives from each domain. The branch length from one organism to another (between the end of the branches and the connecting node) roughly represents the evolutionary distance (number of changes per nucleotide) between those two organisms. Only selected groups of organisms are included in the tree. (B) Phylogenetic tree of selected bacterial divisions. The tree was generated by the maximum parsimony method. Selected species from several bacterial divisions were compiled, and a dendrogram was generated to examine the evolutionary positions of the (in bold). Numbers at selected nodes are the "bootstrap values," that is, the percentage of trees that produce the node. Nodes without numbers were recovered in 100% of the bootstrap replicates. The rRNA sequences have a weak association to the and the sequences. The ARB software program ( ) was used to generate the phylogenetic tree. Numbers after organism names are GenBank accession numbers.

Citation: Tanner M, Harris J, Pace N. 1999. Molecular Phylogeny of and Relatives, p 1-8. In Stephens R (ed), Chlamydia. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818203.ch1
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

Local dendrogram of the , including representative sequences from all four spp. and those of the spp. and “Parachlamydia acanthamoebae.” The tree was generated by the neighbor-joining method, and percentages are derived from 100 bootstrap resamplings. The bar indicates two nucleotide changes for every 100 nucleotides. The ARB software program was used to generate the phylogenetic tree. Numbers after organism names are GenBank accession numbers

Citation: Tanner M, Harris J, Pace N. 1999. Molecular Phylogeny of and Relatives, p 1-8. In Stephens R (ed), Chlamydia. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818203.ch1
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555818203.chap1
1. Amann, R.,, N. Springer,, W. Schdnhuber,, W. Ludwig,, E. N. Schmid,, K.-D. Muiler,, and R. Michel. 1997. Obligate intracellular bacterial parasites of acanthamoebae related to Chlamydia spp. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:115121.
2. Amann, R. I.,, W. Ludwig,, and K.-H. Schleifer. 1995. Phylogenetic identification and in situ detection of individual microbial cells without cultivation. Microbiol. Rev. 59:143169.
3. Coleman, A. W.,, and J. C. Mai. 1997. Ribosomal DNA ITS-1 and ITS-2 sequence comparisons as a tool for predicting genetic relatedness. J. Mol. Evol. 45:168177.
4. Everett, K. D. E.,, and A. A. Andersen. 1997. The ribosomal intergenic spacer and domain I of the 23S rRNA gene are phylogenetic markers for Chlamydia spp. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 41:461413.
5. Everett, K. D. E.,, R. M. Bush,, and A. A. Andersen. 1999. Emended description of the order Chlamydiales, proposal of Parachlamydiaceae fam. nov. and Simkaniaceae fam. nov., each containing one monotypic genus, revised taxonomy of the family Chlamydiaceae, including a new genus and five new species, and standards for the identification of organisms. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 49:415440.
6. Fuerst, J. A.,, S. K. Sambhi,, J. L. Paynter,, J. A. Hawkins,, and J. G. Atherton. 1991. Isolation of a bacterium resembling Pirellula species from primary tissue culture of the giant tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon). Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:31273134.
7. Fukushi, H.,, and K. Hirai. 1992. Proposal of Chlamydia pecorum sp. nov. for Chlamydia strains derived from ruminants. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 42:306308.
8. Gaydos, C. A.,, L. Palmer,, T. C. Quinn,, S. Falkow,, and J. J. Eiden. 1993. Phylogenetic relationship of Chlamydia pneumoniae to Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia trachomatis as determined by analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA sequences. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 43:610612.
9. Grayston, J. T.,, C.-C. Kuo,, L. A. Campbell,, and S.-P. Wang. 1989. Chlamydia pneumoniae sp. nov. for Chlamydia sp. strain TWAR. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 39:8890.
10. Herrmann, B.,, O. Winqvist,, J. G. Mattsson,, and L. A. Kirsebom. 1996. Differentiation of Chlamydia spp. by sequence determination and restriction endonuclease cleavage of RNase P genes. J. Clin. Microbiol. 34:18971902.
11. Hugenholtz, P.,, B. M. Goebel,, and N. R. Pace. 1998. Impact of culture-independent studies on the emerging phylogenetic view of bacterial diversity. J. Bacteriol. 180:47654774.
12. Janssen, P. H.,, A. Schuhmann,, E. Morschel,, and F. A, Rainey. 1997. Novel anaerobic ultramicrobacteria belonging to the Verrucomicrobiales lineage of bacterial descent isolated by dilution culture from anoxic rice paddy soil. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:13821388.
13. Kahane, S.,, R. Gonen,, C. Sayada,, J. Elion,, and M. G. Friedman. 1993. Description and partial characterization of a new chlamydia-like microorganism. FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 109:329333.
14. Kahane, S.,, E. Metzer,, and M. G. Friedman. 1995. Evidence that the novel microorganism 'Z' may belong to a new genus in the family Chlamydiaceae. FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 126:203208.
15. Kaltenboeck, B.,, K. G. Kousoulas,, and J. Storz. 1993. Structures of and allelic diversity and relationships among the major outer membrane protein (ompA) genes of the four chlamydial species. J. Bacteriol. 175:487502.
16. Kuo, C.-C.,, H.-H. Chen,, S.-P. Wang,, and J. T. Grayston. 1986. Identification of a new group of Chlamydia psittaci strains called TWAR. J. Clin. Microbiol. 24:10341037.
17. Meijer, A.,, and J. M. Ossewaarde,. 1998. Broad range chlamydia PCR detects previously unrecognized Chlamydia sequences: a new genus in the family Chlamydiaceae?, p. 523526. In R. S. Stephens,, G. I. Byrne,, G. Christiansen,, I. N. Clarke,, J. T. Grayston,, R. G. Rank,, G. L. Ridgway,, P. Saikku,, J. Schachter,, and W. E. Stamm (ed.), Chlamydial Infections. Proceedings of the Ninth International Symposium on Human Chlamydial Infection. International Chlamydia Symposium, San Francisco, Calif..
18. Pace, N. R. 1997. A molecular view of microbial diversity and the biosphere. Science 276:734740.
19. Page, L. A. 1968. Proposal for the recognition of two species in the genus Chlamydia Jones, Rake, and Stearns, 1945. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 18:5166.
20. Pettersson, B.,, A. Andersson,, T. Leitner,, O. Olsvik,, M. Uhlen,, C. Storey,, and C. M. Black. 1997. Evolutionary relationships among members of the genus Chlamydia based on 16S ribosomal DNA analysis. J. Bacteriol. 179:41954205.
21. Pudjiatmoko,, H. Fukushi,, Y. Ochiai,, T. Yamaguchi,, and K. Hirai. 1997. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Chlamydia based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 47:425431.
22. Pudjiatmoko,, H. Fukushi,, Y. Ochiai,, T. Yamaguchi,, and K. Hirai. 1998. In vitro susceptibility of Chlamydia pecorum to macrolides, tetracyclines, quinolones and /3-lactam. Microbiol. Immunol. 42:6163.
23. Strunk, O.,, and W. Ludwig. 1996. ARB: a software environment for sequence data, http://www.mikro.biologie.tu-muenchen.de/pub/ARB/documentation/arb.ps.
24. Takahashi, T.,, M. Masuda,, T. Tsuruno,, Y. Mori,, I. Takashima,, T. Hiramune,, and N. Kikuchi. 1997. Phylogenetic analysis of Chlamydia psittaci strains from birds based on 16S rRNA gene sequence. J. Clin. Microbiol. 35:29082914.
25. Weisburg, W. G.,, T. P. Hatch,, and C. R. Woese. 1986. Eubacterial origin of chlamydiae. J. Bacteriol. 167:570574.
26. Woese, C. R, 1987. Bacterial evolution. Microbiol Rev. 51:221271.
27. Woese, C. R.,, O. Kandler,, and M. L. Wheelis. 1990. Towards a natural system of organisms: proposal for the domains Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:45764579.

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error