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Chapter 2 : Genomic Autobiographies of Chlamydiae

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Genomic Autobiographies of Chlamydiae, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

The genome sequences of and contain the respective autobiographies that have been translated, read, and begun to be interpreted. The species contains three biovariants: trachoma, lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV), and murine (MoPn). Strains of that are natural pathogens of humans are members of either the trachoma or LGV biovar. Chlamydiae have substantial capacity for DNA repair and recombination, including mismatch repair (MutL, MutS, and three parologous MutY proteins), the excinuclease UvrABCD complex, transcription-repair coupling factor (TRCF), and a number of proteins implicated in recombination-coupled repair such as RecA, RecBCD, and RecJ. One of the phenotypic hallmarks of chlamydial development is the remarkably condensed nucleoid structure observed in elementary bodies (EB). The central metabolism determined for and was found to be conserved. It appears that chlamydiae use fewer transport systems than free-living bacteria and rely on transport systems with broad specificity. The presence of an apparently complete glycolytic pathway was complemented by a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The genome contains genes encoding TrpA, TrpB, and TrpC, as well as a gene encoding a regulator of tryptophan gene transcription, TrpR. In the context of the unique biology and phylogeny of chlamydiae, the current challenges for productive microbiological research, and the medical imperative for progress in understanding chlamydial infection and disease, is that having a database available for the entire and genomes will provide enduring benefits for chlamydial research.

Citation: Stephens R. 1999. Genomic Autobiographies of Chlamydiae, p 9-27. In Stephens R (ed), Chlamydia. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818203.ch2

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Type III Secretion System
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Figures

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Figure 1

Pulsed-field gel electrophoretic comparison of genomic DNA obtained from four strains of (B/TW5/OT, C/TW3/OT, D/UW3/Cx, and LGV-434). Sse8387I digestion of genomic DNA from trachoma biovar strains (C and D) exhibits restriction fragment lengths identical to those obtained for LGV biovar DNA. Arrow indicates polymorphic band for serovar B. The switch time was a 1- to 15-s ramp for 20 h at 200 V.

Citation: Stephens R. 1999. Genomic Autobiographies of Chlamydiae, p 9-27. In Stephens R (ed), Chlamydia. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818203.ch2
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Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

Ordered list of protein coding genes of Asterisks indicate genes not found in the genome.

Citation: Stephens R. 1999. Genomic Autobiographies of Chlamydiae, p 9-27. In Stephens R (ed), Chlamydia. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818203.ch2
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Schematic overview of chlamydial metabolism inferred from the gene repertoire of and .

Citation: Stephens R. 1999. Genomic Autobiographies of Chlamydiae, p 9-27. In Stephens R (ed), Chlamydia. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818203.ch2
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Figure 3

Genomic context of type III secretion system genes. Genes are identified by the gene nomenclature of their respective related ortholog or by consecutive ORF-assigned number. has the same relative gene content and genomic organization. Arrows indicate the coding strand direction and not necessarily operon transcription.

Citation: Stephens R. 1999. Genomic Autobiographies of Chlamydiae, p 9-27. In Stephens R (ed), Chlamydia. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818203.ch2
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Figure 4

Amino acid sequence alignment among Hsp60 orthologs from mitochondria, and three GroEL paralogs. Conserved and identical residues are boxed and identical residues are bold.

Citation: Stephens R. 1999. Genomic Autobiographies of Chlamydiae, p 9-27. In Stephens R (ed), Chlamydia. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818203.ch2
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