1887

Chapter 15 : A Dedicated Life

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A Dedicated Life, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Pasteur possessed several personality traits rarely found together in one individual. His devotion to scientific research was complete, and, despite the stroke that partly paralyzed him at the age of forty-six, he worked with incredible intensity until his health completely failed. He was a masterful technician but also highly intuitive. He derived problems from industrial or medical questions, and never shied away from practical problems, but he also pursued the large theoretical concepts involved in his studies and thus reached fundamental scientific generalizations. He knew well that science is of equal relevance to all people, and is one of the few human activities of universal value. In his romantic student days Pasteur had thought that he would be devoting his scientific life to the solution of abstract problems pertaining to the nature of life. Because of his immense practical skill in converting theoretical knowledge into technological processes, he was one of the most productive men of the nineteenth century. His writings carry a message that will encourage us as we try to reach beyond the conventional theories of fermentation and infection.

Citation: Dubos R. 1998. A Dedicated Life, p 140-151. In Pasteur and Modern Science. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818265.ch15

Key Concept Ranking

Infectious Diseases
0.6991539
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
0.50719225
Typhoid Fever
0.40010527
BCG Vaccine
0.40010527
Typhoid Fever
0.40010527
0.6991539
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Figures

Image of Figure 1a and Figure 1b
Figure 1a and Figure 1b

Pasteur and his family, (a) Pasteur at his villa at Pont-Gisquet dictating a paper to Madame Pasteur, (b) Madame Pasteur and the daughter Marie-Louise Pasteur. The photo was taken in the garden of the Ecole Normale around 1877. (c) Pasteur surrounded by his family in the garden of his summer place at Arbois, in 1892. From left to right; front row: Madame Pasteur, grandson Louis Pasteur Vallery-Radot, Pasteur, granddaughter Camilc Vallery-Radot; back row: nephew Laurent, son-in-law René Vallery-Radot, daughter Marie-Louise (married to Rene Vallery-Radot). (d) Pasteur in 1891 on the beach at Saint- Aubin, with his grandchildren.

Citation: Dubos R. 1998. A Dedicated Life, p 140-151. In Pasteur and Modern Science. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818265.ch15
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Image of Figure 1c and Figure 1d
Figure 1c and Figure 1d

Pasteur and his family, (a) Pasteur at his villa at Pont-Gisquet dictating a paper to Madame Pasteur, (b) Madame Pasteur and the daughter Marie-Louise Pasteur. The photo was taken in the garden of the Ecole Normale around 1877. (c) Pasteur surrounded by his family in the garden of his summer place at Arbois, in 1892. From left to right; front row: Madame Pasteur, grandson Louis Pasteur Vallery-Radot, Pasteur, granddaughter Camilc Vallery-Radot; back row: nephew Laurent, son-in-law René Vallery-Radot, daughter Marie-Louise (married to Rene Vallery-Radot). (d) Pasteur in 1891 on the beach at Saint- Aubin, with his grandchildren.

Citation: Dubos R. 1998. A Dedicated Life, p 140-151. In Pasteur and Modern Science. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818265.ch15
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Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

The Pasteur Institute, as illustrated in a 19th century engraving. Inaugurated November 14, 1888, the Pasteur Institute was initially primarily a center for treatment of rabies and other contagious diseases, but has developed into a major center for microbiological research. Emile Roux, Pasteur's successor, defined the Pasteur Institute as: “a cooperative scientific venture where each scientist strives toward a common end, while at the same time retaining independence of ideas and approaches.”

The modern Pasteur Institute employs more than 2000 people and has numerous buildings both in Paris and elsewhere. It produces serums and vaccines for medical and veterinary use as well as laboratory products for research. Among the vaccines and serums that it produces are antitoxins for diphtheria, tetanus, botulism, and staphylococcal infection, BCG vaccine for tuberculosis, and vaccines for polio, typhoid fever, paratyphoid fever, whooping cough, cholera, and influenza. The Pasteur Institute is also a leader in research on acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and is the codiscoverer of the blood test for AIDS infection.

The following Nobel Prize Winners were at the Pasteur Institute: 1907: Charles Laveran. Discovery of the protozoan which causes malaria; 1908: Elie Metchnikoff. Discovery of the process of phagocytosis; 1919: Jules Bordet. Discovery of complement and other discoveries in immunology; 1928: Charles Nicolle. Discovery that typhus fever is transmitted by the body louse; 1957: Daniel Bovet. Production of artificial curare (South American poison) for use as a muscle relaxant; 1965: Andre Lwoff, Jacques Monod, and Franҫois Jacob. Fundamental discoveries in molecular genetics and cellular biochemistry.

Citation: Dubos R. 1998. A Dedicated Life, p 140-151. In Pasteur and Modern Science. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818265.ch15
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Download as Powerpoint

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