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Chapter 8 : Studies on Wound Infections: the Later Wollstein Years

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Studies on Wound Infections: the Later Wollstein Years, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Throughout the period after Robert Koch's initial success with anthrax, his self-confidence increased enormously. All his spare time was now occupied with research, and he continued to show new and innovative approaches. Koch also used some o f the spleen o f the dead mouse to inoculate rabbits, which died 24 hours after inoculation. Considering Koch's later detractors, and the tremendous criticisms that he suffered, we can see here, in a nutshell, the essence of Koch's personality. Koch's work on anthrax was strongly based on the idea that a given disease was caused by a single organism. Microscopy o f wound infections was carried out by the German Edwin Klebs independently of Davaine. Building on the animal work of Davaine and the microscopic work of Klebs, Koch carried out extensive investigations at Wollstein and developed the theory that each septic condition was due to a different organism. Koch studied a wide variety of traumatic infective diseases, including tissue gangrene in mice, spreading abscess in rabbits, pyemia in rabbits, septicemia in rabbits, and erysipelas in rabbits. But the connection of Koch's work on sepsis to humans was lacking. Certainly Koch would have worked with humans if he had been in a medical center, but isolated in Wollstein, he lacked the necessary clinical material.

Citation: Brock T. 1999. Studies on Wound Infections: the Later Wollstein Years, p 70-83. In Robert Koch. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818272.ch8

Key Concept Ranking

Animal Pathogenic Bacteria
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Figures

Image of Figure 8.1
Figure 8.1

Part of a letter from Koch to Cohn.

Citation: Brock T. 1999. Studies on Wound Infections: the Later Wollstein Years, p 70-83. In Robert Koch. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818272.ch8
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Image of Figure 8.2
Figure 8.2

Koch's drawings of bacteria in wound infections, (a) Blood of a mouse infected with anthrax. Red blood cells and anthrax bacilli, (b) Portion of cartilage and adjacent tissue of a mouse ear, showing chain-like masses of micrococci (labeled b and c). (c) Blood of a septicaemic mouse, dried on a cover slip, stained with methyl violet, and mounted in Canada balsam. Red blood cells and small bacilli are seen, (d) A part of the vascular network of a septicaemic rabbit.

Citation: Brock T. 1999. Studies on Wound Infections: the Later Wollstein Years, p 70-83. In Robert Koch. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818272.ch8
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Image of Figure 8.3
Figure 8.3

A view of Koch's primitive laboratory facilities in Wollstein.

Citation: Brock T. 1999. Studies on Wound Infections: the Later Wollstein Years, p 70-83. In Robert Koch. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818272.ch8
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

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