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Chapter 11 : Infectious Disease Issues in Xenotransplantation

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Infectious Disease Issues in Xenotransplantation, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Xenotransplantation refers to the therapeutic use of living animal tissue in humans. Xenotransplantation has the potential to infect human recipients with agents that are not endemic in human populations, thereby introducing new infections to the human community (xenogeneic infections). The Public health service (PHS) draft guideline on infectious disease issues in Xenotransplantation emphasizes the importance of including experts in human and veterinary infectious diseases and microbiology on the xenotransplantation team. In addition to emphasizing the importance of screening and surveillance, the PHS draft guideline on infectious disease issues in Xenotransplantation recommends that archives of biologic specimens obtained from the xenograft source animals and human recipients both before and at intervals following the xenotransplantation be maintained. The absence of recognized disease attributable to foamy virus in infected animals of any species, including the small numbers of SFV-infected humans studied to date, combined with the absence of identified secondary transmission among humans, have led some experts to argue that foamy virus infections of humans are benign end-point infections of no significance to human health. Efforts to address issues in xenotransplantation have accomplished much in a short time. Major research questions have been framed, an infrastructure for public policy has been outlined, and tools that enable the science necessary to define whether endogenous retroviruses pose a risk to human xenograft recipients have been developed and deployed.

Citation: Chapman L, Switzer W, Sandstrom P, Butera S, Heneine W, Folks T. 1999. Infectious Disease Issues in Xenotransplantation, p 165-179. In Scheld W, Craig W, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 3. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818418.ch11

Key Concept Ranking

Feline immunodeficiency virus
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Simian foamy virus
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Simian immunodeficiency virus
0.52922076
Feline immunodeficiency virus
0.52922076
Simian foamy virus
0.52922076
Feline immunodeficiency virus
0.52922076
Simian immunodeficiency virus
0.52922076
Simian foamy virus
0.52922076
0.52922076
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Figures

Image of Figure 1
Figure 1

Number of U.S. organ transplants compared to number of patients on waiting list at year's end. 1988 to 1996 ( ).

Citation: Chapman L, Switzer W, Sandstrom P, Butera S, Heneine W, Folks T. 1999. Infectious Disease Issues in Xenotransplantation, p 165-179. In Scheld W, Craig W, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 3. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818418.ch11
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Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

Distinguishing in fection from microchimerism in endogenous retrovirus DNA-positive samples. (Adapted and reprinted from reference .)

Citation: Chapman L, Switzer W, Sandstrom P, Butera S, Heneine W, Folks T. 1999. Infectious Disease Issues in Xenotransplantation, p 165-179. In Scheld W, Craig W, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 3. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818418.ch11
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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1

PCR analysis of pig mtDNA sequences in serum samples from 10 diabetic patients who received pig islet cell xenografts between June 1990 and April 1993

Citation: Chapman L, Switzer W, Sandstrom P, Butera S, Heneine W, Folks T. 1999. Infectious Disease Issues in Xenotransplantation, p 165-179. In Scheld W, Craig W, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 3. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818418.ch11
Generic image for table
Table 2

Analysis of DNA from patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells for porcine sequences and patient plasma for anti-PERV antibodies

Citation: Chapman L, Switzer W, Sandstrom P, Butera S, Heneine W, Folks T. 1999. Infectious Disease Issues in Xenotransplantation, p 165-179. In Scheld W, Craig W, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 3. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818418.ch11

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