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Chapter 14 : Web-Based Surveillance Systems for Human, Animal, and Plant Diseases

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Web-Based Surveillance Systems for Human, Animal, and Plant Diseases, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

The early detection of infectious diseases is critical for early response and control of disease outbreaks. If outbreaks can be detected early, public health interventions may be able to reduce the size of the outbreak and mitigate its consequences. With more than 75% of emerging infectious diseases estimated to be zoonotic ( ), the One Health concept can be applied to the surveillance of disease outbreaks that affect human, animal, and plant species. Traditional surveillance systems often rely on time-consuming, labor-intensive, and expensive methods (such as laboratory data or clinician case-report forms) to collect outbreak data, which then pass through multiple levels of health professionals before being confirmed and announced. This conventional system can delay public health responses that would otherwise prevent the spread of disease. However, current information technology allows the use of computers, mobile phones, remote sensing, and Internet searches to globally communicate and share information on disease outbreaks ( ). This information is often free to the general public, with access to valuable information from websites and Internet-based applications.

Citation: Madoff L, Li A. 2014. Web-Based Surveillance Systems for Human, Animal, and Plant Diseases, p 213-225. In Atlas R, Maloy S (ed), One Health. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0015-2012

Key Concept Ranking

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
0.5332532
Human Infectious Diseases
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Infectious Diseases
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Figures

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Figure 1

Website of ProMED-mail (http://www.promedmail.org/). ProMED is a service of the ISID and provides reports, moderated by a panel of experts, on outbreaks of emerging diseases in humans, animals, and plants. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0015-2012.f1

Citation: Madoff L, Li A. 2014. Web-Based Surveillance Systems for Human, Animal, and Plant Diseases, p 213-225. In Atlas R, Maloy S (ed), One Health. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0015-2012
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Figure 2

Website of HealthMap (http://www.healthmap.org/en/), based at Children's Hospital Boston, which shows, on an interactive map, infectious disease outbreaks automatically derived from numerous sources and curated by a human team. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0015-2012.f2

Citation: Madoff L, Li A. 2014. Web-Based Surveillance Systems for Human, Animal, and Plant Diseases, p 213-225. In Atlas R, Maloy S (ed), One Health. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0015-2012
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Figure 3

The EMPRES-i website (http://empres-i.fao.org), maintained by the FAO of the United Nations, which reports animal and zoonotic disease outbreaks. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0015-2012.f3

Citation: Madoff L, Li A. 2014. Web-Based Surveillance Systems for Human, Animal, and Plant Diseases, p 213-225. In Atlas R, Maloy S (ed), One Health. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0015-2012
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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1

Formal versus informal information sources

Citation: Madoff L, Li A. 2014. Web-Based Surveillance Systems for Human, Animal, and Plant Diseases, p 213-225. In Atlas R, Maloy S (ed), One Health. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0015-2012
Generic image for table
Table 2

Examples of digital surveillance systems

Citation: Madoff L, Li A. 2014. Web-Based Surveillance Systems for Human, Animal, and Plant Diseases, p 213-225. In Atlas R, Maloy S (ed), One Health. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0015-2012

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