1887

Chapter 2 : The Value of the One Health Approach: Shifting from Emergency Response to Prevention of Zoonotic Disease Threats at Their Source

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $15.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

The Value of the One Health Approach: Shifting from Emergency Response to Prevention of Zoonotic Disease Threats at Their Source, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555818432/9781555818425_Chap02-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555818432/9781555818425_Chap02-2.gif

Abstract:

When an infectious disease organism from an animal breaches the species barrier to infect a human, it enters an immunologically naïve population. Depending on incompletely understood risk factors, which depend on both the organism and the infected human, there are several possible transmission pathways: (i) no further transmission, with the human an endpoint as in rabies and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; (ii) nonsustained human-to-human transmission such as presently occurs in close human contact with persons with influenza A (H5N1) and human monkeypox ( ); (iii) sustained human-to-human transmission following initial transmission from an animal source, as observed with influenza A (H1N1) that emerged as a pandemic in 2009; and (iv) sustained transmission that leads to endemicity ( Fig. 1 ). HIV presents the most important recent example of the latter, but the pattern of animal infections becoming endemic in humans appears to have occurred throughout history, suggesting that most, if not all, endemic infections in humans have come from animals ( ).

Citation: Heymann D, Dixon M. 2014. The Value of the One Health Approach: Shifting from Emergency Response to Prevention of Zoonotic Disease Threats at Their Source, p 17-31. In Atlas R, Maloy S (ed), One Health. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0011-2012

Key Concept Ranking

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
0.4719016
Simian foamy virus
0.40125
0.4719016
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of Figure 1
Figure 1

Potential pathways after emergence. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0011-2012.f1

Citation: Heymann D, Dixon M. 2014. The Value of the One Health Approach: Shifting from Emergency Response to Prevention of Zoonotic Disease Threats at Their Source, p 17-31. In Atlas R, Maloy S (ed), One Health. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0011-2012
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

Economic impact of recent emerging infection events. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0011-2012.f2

Citation: Heymann D, Dixon M. 2014. The Value of the One Health Approach: Shifting from Emergency Response to Prevention of Zoonotic Disease Threats at Their Source, p 17-31. In Atlas R, Maloy S (ed), One Health. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0011-2012
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 3
Figure 3

Shifting the paradigm from emergency response to preventing emergence at its source. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0011-2012.f3

Citation: Heymann D, Dixon M. 2014. The Value of the One Health Approach: Shifting from Emergency Response to Prevention of Zoonotic Disease Threats at Their Source, p 17-31. In Atlas R, Maloy S (ed), One Health. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0011-2012
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 4
Figure 4

Flow chart showing steps for transforming evidence at the animal-human interface into policy. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0011-2012.f4

Citation: Heymann D, Dixon M. 2014. The Value of the One Health Approach: Shifting from Emergency Response to Prevention of Zoonotic Disease Threats at Their Source, p 17-31. In Atlas R, Maloy S (ed), One Health. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.OH-0011-2012
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555818432.chap2
1. Yousaf MZ,, Qasim M,, Zia S,, Khan MR,, Ashfaq UA,, Khan S . 2012. Rabies molecular virology, diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Virol J 9 : 50. doi:10.1186/1743-422X-9-50. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
2. Trevitt CR,, Singh PN . 2003. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: pathology, epidemiology, and public health implications. Am J Clin Nutr 78 : 651656. [PubMed]
3. Liu J,, Xiao H,, Lei F,, Zhu Q,, Qin K,, Zhang XW,, Zhang XL,, Zhao D,, Wang G,, Feng Y,, Ma J,, Liu W,, Wang J,, Gao GF . 2005. Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus infection in migratory birds. Science 309 : 1206. doi:10.1126/science.1115273. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
4. Ellis CK,, Carroll DS,, Lash RR,, Peterson AT,, Damon IK,, Malekani J,, Formenty P . 2012. Ecology and geography of human monkeypox case occurrences across Africa. J Wildl Dis 48 : 335347. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
5. Smith GJ,, Vijaykrishna D,, Bahl J,, Lycett SJ,, Worobey M,, Pybus OG,, Ma SK,, Cheung CL,, Raghwani J,, Bhatt S,, Peiris JS,, Guan Y,, Rambaut A . 2009. Origins and evolutionary genomics of the 2009 swine-origin H1N1 influenza A epidemic. Nature 459 : 11221125. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
6. Holmes EC . 2001. On the origin and evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 76 : 239254. [PubMed]
7. Bengis RG,, Leighton FA,, Fischer JR,, Artois M,, Mörner T,, Tate CM . 2004. The role of wildlife in emerging and re-emerging zoonoses. Rev Sci Tech 23 : 497511. [PubMed]
8. Delgado C,, Rosegrant M,, Steinfeld H,, Ehui S,, Courbois C . 1999. Livestock to 2020: the Next Food Revolution. Food, Agriculture, and the Environment Discussion Paper 28. International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington DC.
9. Lloyd-Smith JO,, George D,, Pepin KM,, Pitzer VE,, Pulliam JR,, Dobson AP,, Hudson PJ,, Grenfell BT . 2009. Epidemic dynamics at the human-animal interface. Science 326 : 13621367. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
10. Taylor LH,, Latham SM,, Woolhouse ME . 2001. Risk factors for human disease emergence. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 356 : 983989. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
11. Wolfe ND . 2010. The transition from pandemic response to pandemic prevention, p 3335. In Institute on Science for Global Policy (ed), Emerging and Persistent Infectious Diseases: Focus on Surveillance. Institute on Science for Global Policy, Washington, DC.
12. Kruse H,, Kirkemo AM,, Handeland K . 2004. Wildlife as source of zoonotic infections. Emerg Inf Dis 10 : 20672072. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
13. Thorns CJ . 2000. Bacterial food-borne zoonoses. Rev Sci Tech 19 : 226239. [PubMed]
14. World Health Organization . 2005. Control of neglected zoonotic disease: challenges and the way forward. World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. http://www.who.int/zoonoses/Consultation_Sept05_en.pdf (last accessed January 17, 2013).
15. Galante M,, Garin O,, Sicuri E,, Cots F,, García-Altés A,, Ferrer M,, Dominguez A,, Alonso J . 2012. Health services utilization, work absenteeism and costs of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in Spain: a multicenter-longitudinal study. PLoS One 7 : e31696. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0031696. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
16. World Health Organization . 2005. International Health Regulations (2005), 2nd ed. World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2008/9789241580410_eng.pdf (last accessed January 18, 2013).
17. Rodier G,, Greenspan AL,, Hughes JM,, Heymann DL . 2007. Global public health security. Emerg Infect Dis 13 : 14471452. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
18. Marsh Inc . 2008. The Economic and Social Impact of Emerging Infectious Disease: Mitigation through Detection, Research, and Response. http://www.healthcare.philips.com/main/shared/assets/documents/bioshield/ecoandsocialimpactofemerginginfectiousdisease_111208.pdf (last accessed June 5, 2013).
19. Hancock J,, Cho G . 2008. Assessment of likely impacts of avian influenza on rural poverty reduction in Asia: responses, impacts and recommendations for IFAD strategy. IFAD occasional papers no. 6. International Fund for Agricultural Development, Rome, Italy. http://www.ifad.org/operations/projects/regions/pi/paper/6.pdf (last accessed June 5, 2013).
20. Dixon S,, McDonald S,, Roberts J . 2002. The impact of HIV and AIDS on Africa's economic development. BMJ 324 : 232234. [PubMed]
21. Chan-Yeung M,, Xu RH . 2003. SARS: epidemiology. Respirology 8(Suppl): S9S14.
22. Wang LF,, Eaton BT . 2007. Bats, civets and the emergence of SARS. Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 315 : 325344. [PubMed]
23. World Health Organization, Department of Communicable Disease Surveillance and Response . 2004. WHO SARS Risk Assessment and Preparedness Framework. World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. http://www.who.int/csr/resources/publications/CDS_CSR_ARO_2004_2.pdf (last accessed January 17, 2013).
24. Keogh-Brown MR,, Smith RD . 2008. The economic impact of SARS: how does the reality match the predictions? Health Policy 88 : 110120. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
25. International Livestock Research Institute . 2012. Mapping of Poverty and Likely Zoonoses Hotspots. Zoonoses Project 4: Report to Department for International Development, UK. International Livestock Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya. http://cgspace.cgiar.org/bitstream/handle/10568/21161/ZooMap_July2012_final.pdf (last accessed June 5, 2013).
26. Biek R,, Real LA . 2010. The landscape genetics of infectious disease emergence and spread. Mol Ecol 19 : 35153531. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
27. Barclay E . 2008. Predicting the next pandemic. Lancet 372 : 10251026. [PubMed]
28. American Veterinary Medical Association . 2008. One Health: a New Professional Imperative. Final report of One Health Initiative Task Force. American Veterinary Medical Association, Schaumburg, IL. https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/Reports/Documents/onehealth_final.pdf (last accessed June 5, 2013).
29. Parry J . 2003. Asymptomatic animal traders prove positive for SARS virus. BMJ 327 : 582. doi:10.1136/bmj.327.7415.582-a. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
30. Wolfe ND,, Dunavan CP,, Diamond J . 2007. Origins of major human infectious diseases. Nature 447 : 279283. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
31. World Health Organization . 2012. Outbreak news. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, Yosemite National Park, United States of America. Wkly Epidemiol Rec 87 : 345346. [PubMed]
32. Reynolds MG,, Carroll DS,, Karem KL . 2012. Factors affecting the likelihood of monkeypox's emergence and spread in the post-smallpox era. Curr Opin Virol 2 : 335343. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
33. Coker RJ,, Hunter BM,, Rudge JW,, Liverani M,, Hanvoravongchai P . 2011. Emerging infectious diseases in southeast Asia: regional challenges to control. Lancet 377 : 599609. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
34. Sejvar JJ,, Chowdary Y,, Schomogyi M,, Stevens J,, Patel J,, Karem K,, Fischer M,, Kuehnert MJ,, Zaki SR,, Paddock CD,, Guarner J,, Shieh WJ,, Patton JL,, Bernard N,, Li Y,, Olson VA,, Kline RL,, Loparev VN,, Schmid DS,, Beard B,, Regnery RR,, Damon IK . 2004. Human monkeypox infection: a family cluster in the midwestern United States. J Infect Dis 190 : 18331840. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
35. Smolinski MS,, Hamburg MA,, Lederberg J (ed). 2003. Microbial Threats to Health: Emergence, Detection, and Response. National Academies Press, Washington, DC.
36. Addiss DG,, Davis JP,, Roberts JM,, Mast EE . 1992. Epidemiology of giardiasis in Wisconsin: increasing incidence of reported cases and unexplained seasonal trends. Am J Trop Med Hyg 47 : 1319. [PubMed]
37. Lalis A,, Leblois R,, Lecompte E,, Denys C,, ter Meulen J,, Wirth T . 2012. The impact of human conflict on the genetics of Mastomys natalensis and Lassa virus in West Africa. PLoS One 7 : e37068. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0037068. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
38. Luby SP,, Gurley ES,, Hossain MJ . 2009. Transmission of human infection with Nipah virus. Clin Infect Dis 49 : 17431748. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
39. Keesing F,, Belden LK,, Daszak P,, Dobson A,, Harvell CD,, Holt RD,, Hudson P,, Jolles A,, Jones KE,, Mitchell CE,, Myers SS,, Bogich T,, Ostfeld RS . 2010. Impacts of biodiversity on the emergence and transmission of infectious diseases. Nature 468 : 647652. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
40. Groseth A,, Feldmann H,, Strong JE . 2007. The ecology of Ebola virus. Trends Microbiol 15 : 408416. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
41. LeBreton M,, Prosser AT,, Tamoufel U,, Sateren W,, Mpoudi-Nigole E,, Diffol JL,, Burke DS,, Wolfe ND . 2006. Patterns of bushmeat hunting and perceptions of disease risk among central African communities. Anim Conserv 9 : 357363.
42. Rizkalla C,, Blanco-Silva F,, Gruver S . 2007. Modeling the impact of Ebola and bushmeat hunting on western lowland gorillas. Ecohealth 4 : 151155.
43. Pongsiri MJ,, Roman J,, Ezenwa VO,, Goldberg TL,, Koren HS,, Newbold SC,, Ostfeld RS,, Pattanaykak SK,, Salkeld DJ . 2009. Biodiversity loss affects global disease ecology. Bioscience 59 : 945954.
44. Anyamba A,, Chretien JP,, Small J,, Tucker CJ,, Formenty PB,, Richardson JH,, Britch SC,, Schnabel DC,, Erickson RL,, Linthicum KJ . 2009. Prediction of a Rift Valley fever outbreak. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106 : 955959. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
45. Lau CL,, Smythe LD,, Craig SB,, Weinstein P . 2010. Climate change, flooding, urbanisation and leptospirosis: fuelling the fire? Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 104 : 631638. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
46. Ogbu O,, Ajuluchukwu E,, Uneke CJ . 2007. Lassa fever in West African sub-region: an overview. J Vector Borne Dis 44 : 111. [PubMed]
47. de Boer Y . 2012. An international climate treaty: is it worth fighting for? (meeting transcript). Chatham House, London, United Kingdom. http://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/default/files/public/Meetings/Meeting%20Transcripts/280212deboer.pdf (last accessed January 20, 2013).
48. Balkhy HH,, Memish ZA . 2003. Rift Valley fever: an uninvited zoonosis in the Arabian peninsula. Int J Antimicrob Agents 21 : 153157. [PubMed]
49. European Food Safety Authority . 2009. Special measures to reduce the risk for consumers through Salmonella in table eggs—e.g. cooling of table eggs. Scientific Opinion of the Panel on Biological Hazards. EFSA J 957 : 129.
50. Prusiner SB . 1997. Prion diseases and the BSE crisis. Science 278 : 245251. [PubMed]
51. Soon JM,, Chadd SA,, Baines RN . 2011. Escherichia coli O157:H7 in beef cattle: on farm contamination and pre-slaughter control methods. Anim Health Res Rev 12 : 197211. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
52. Barton MD . 2000. Antibiotic use in animal feed and its impact on human health. Nutr Res Rev 13 : 279299.
53. Segura PA,, François M,, Gagnon C,, Sauve S . 2009. Review of the occurrence of anti-infectives in contaminated wastewaters and natural and drinking waters. Environ Health Perspect 117 : 675684. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
54. Abraham WR . 2011. Megacities as sources for pathogenic bacteria in rivers and their fate downstream. Int J Microbiol 2011 : 798292. doi:10.1155/2011/798292. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
55. Jay MT,, Cooley M,, Carychao D,, Wiscomb GW,, Sweitzer RA,, Crawford-Miksza L,, Farrar JA,, Lau DK,, O'Connell J,, Millington A,, Asmundson RV,, Atwill ER,, Mandrell RE . 2007. Escherichia coli O157:H7 in feral swine near spinach fields and cattle, central California coast. Emerg Infect Dis 13 : 19081911. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
56. Khan AS,, Tshioko FK,, Heymann DL,, Le Guenno B,, Nabeth P,, Kerstiëns B,, Fleerackers Y,, Kilmarx PH,, Rodier GR,, Nkuku O,, Rollin PE,, Sanchez A,, Zaki SR,, Swanepoel R,, Tomori O,, Nichol ST,, Peters CJ,, Muyembe-Tamfum JJ,, Ksiazek TG . 1999. The reemergence of Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 1995. J Infect Dis 179(Suppl 1): S76S86. [PubMed] [CrossRef]
57. Cascio A,, Bosilkovski M,, Rodriguez-Morales AJ,, Pappas G . 2011. The socio-ecology of zoonotic infections. Clin Microbiol Infect 17 : 336342. [CrossRef]
58. The FAO-OIE-WHO Collaboration . 2010. Sharing responsibilities and coordinating global activities to address health risks at the animal-human-ecosystems interfaces (A Tripartite Concept Note). http://www.who.int/foodsafety/zoonoses/final_concept_note_Hanoi.pdf (last accessed January 20, 2013).
59. World Bank . 2010. People, Pathogens, and Our Planet: Volume One—Towards a One Health Approach for Controlling Zoonotic Diseases. World Bank, Washington, DC. https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/2844 (last accessed June 5, 2013).

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error