1887

Chapter 1 : Physiology, Growth, and Inhibition of Microbes in Foods

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $30.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Physiology, Growth, and Inhibition of Microbes in Foods, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555818463/9781555816261_Chap01-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555818463/9781555816261_Chap01-2.gif

Abstract:

This chapter addresses three issues: (i) the ability of bacteria to use different biochemical pathways to generate the energy required to grow under adverse conditions in foods; (ii) the interaction of bacteria and foods in ecosystems in which the cells may exist in a variety of physical and physiological states and in which the roles of intrinsic and extrinsic factors and (iii) the kinetics of microbial growth. It talks about microbial physiology and metabolism, and glycolytic pathways such as Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas Pathway and Entner-Doudoroff Pathway. It also discusses the heterofermentative catabolism, homofermentative catabolism, tricarboxylic acid cycle, aerobes, anaerobes, the regeneration of NAD, and respiration, bioenergetics. The food ecosystem is composed of intrinsic factors, which are inherent to the food (i.e., pH, water activity [a], and nutrients) and extrinsic factors, which are external to it (i.e., temperature, gaseous environment, and the presence of other bacteria). In addition, the chapter focuses on the physiological and genetic responses that bacteria utilize in osmoregulation. Bacteria are classified as psychrophiles, psychrotrophs, mesophiles, and thermophiles according to how temperature influences their growth. Microbial growth in foods is a complex process governed by genetic, biochemical, and environmental factors.

Citation: Montville T, Matthews K. 2013. Physiology, Growth, and Inhibition of Microbes in Foods, p 3-18. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch1
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of Figure 1.1
Figure 1.1

Major catabolic pathways used by foodborne bacteria. doi:10.1128/9781555818463.ch1f1

Citation: Montville T, Matthews K. 2013. Physiology, Growth, and Inhibition of Microbes in Foods, p 3-18. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch1
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 1.2
Figure 1.2

Proton motive force can be generated by respirations, ATP hydrolysis, end product reflux, or anion exchange mechanisms. doi:10.1128/9781555818463.ch1f2

Citation: Montville T, Matthews K. 2013. Physiology, Growth, and Inhibition of Microbes in Foods, p 3-18. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch1
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 1.3
Figure 1.3

Data illustrating injury and repair of bacteria (top) compared to VNC bacteria (bottom). Cells that undergo injury when sublethally stressed show smaller populations when plated on a selective medium (dashed line) than do those plated on a nonselective medium (solid line). As the cells repair, resistance to selective agents is regained and the population levels obtained on the selective medium approach that of the nonselective medium. In the case of VNC cells (bottom), a temperature downshift (↓) results in the loss of the ability to be enumerated on any medium. Culturability is regained upon temperature upshifts (↑). doi:10.1128/9781555818463.ch1f3

Citation: Montville T, Matthews K. 2013. Physiology, Growth, and Inhibition of Microbes in Foods, p 3-18. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch1
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 1.4
Figure 1.4

Relative growth rates of bacteria at different temperatures. doi10.1128/9781555818463.ch1f4

Citation: Montville T, Matthews K. 2013. Physiology, Growth, and Inhibition of Microbes in Foods, p 3-18. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch1
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 1.5
Figure 1.5

Determination of synergy through the use of isobolograms. A synergistic effect is demonstrated when the MICs of mixtures (▲) of compound A and B fall below the line connecting the MIC of B and the MIC of A. doi:10.1128/9781555818463.ch1f5

Citation: Montville T, Matthews K. 2013. Physiology, Growth, and Inhibition of Microbes in Foods, p 3-18. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch1
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555818463.chap1
1. Annous, B.,, P. M. Fratamico,, and J. L. Smith. 2009. Quorum sensing in bacteria: why bacteria behave the way they do. J. Food Sci. 74:R24R37.
2. Chaveerach, P.,, A. A. H. M. ter Huurne,, L. J. A. Lipman,, and F. van Knapen. 2003. Survival and resuscitation of ten strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli under acid conditions. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69:711714.
3. Colwell, R. R.,, and D. J. Grimes (ed.). 2000. Nonculturable Microorganisms in the Environment. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
4. Divol, B.,, and A. Lonvaud-Funel. 2005. Evidence for viable but nonculturable yeast in botrytis-affected wine. J. Appl. Microbiol. 99:8593.
5. Dunny, G. M.,, and S. C. Winans (ed.). 1999. Cell-Cell Signaling in Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
6. Medellin-Pena, M. J.,, and M. W. Griffiths. 2009. Effect of molecules secreted by Lactobacillus acidophilus strain La-5 on Escherichia coli O157:H7 colonization. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 75:11651172.
7. Nilsson, L.,, J. D. Oliver,, and S. Kjelleberg. 1991. Resuscitation of Vibrio vulnificus from viable but nonculturable state. J. Bacteriol. 173:50545059.
8. Oliver, J. D. 2005. The viable but nonculturable state in bacteria. J. Microbiol. 43(Spec. no.):93100.
9. Oliver, J. D. 2010. Recent findings on the viable but nonculturable state in pathogenic bacteria. FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 34:415425.
10. Oliver, J. D.,, M. Dagher,, and K. Linden. 2005. Induction of Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium into the viable but nonculturable state following chlorination of wastewater. J. Water Health 3:249257.
11. Romeo, T. (ed.). 2008. Bacterial Biofilms. Springer-Verlag, New York, NY.
12. Simoes, M.,, L. C. Simoes,, and M. J. Viera. 2010. A review of current and emergent biofilm control strategies. LWT-Food Sci. Technol. 43:573583.
13. Wesche, A. M.,, J. B. Gurtler,, B. P. Marks,, and E. T. Ryser. 2009. Stress, sublethal injury, resuscitation, and virulence of bacterial foodborne pathogens. J. Food Prot. 72:11211138.
14. Wu, V. C. H. 2008. A review of microbial injury and recovery methods in food. Food Microbiol. 25:735744.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1.1

First-order kinetics can be used to describe exponential growth and inactivation

Citation: Montville T, Matthews K. 2013. Physiology, Growth, and Inhibition of Microbes in Foods, p 3-18. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch1
Generic image for table
Table 1.2

Representative specific growth rates and doubling times of microorganisms

Citation: Montville T, Matthews K. 2013. Physiology, Growth, and Inhibition of Microbes in Foods, p 3-18. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch1
Generic image for table
Table 1.3

Examples of quorum sensing in food microbiology

Citation: Montville T, Matthews K. 2013. Physiology, Growth, and Inhibition of Microbes in Foods, p 3-18. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch1

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error