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Chapter 41 : Microbial Risk Assessment

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Microbial Risk Assessment, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

This chapter introduces the basic concepts of microbial risk assessment and provides an overview of the methodology and applications to food safety. Risk analysis is used to develop an estimate of risks, to identify and implement measures to control the risks, and to communicate with stakeholders about the risks and measures applied. A distinct consideration when developing a microbial risk assessment model is the need to account for the changes in the concentration and prevalence of the hazard, as microbes grow and/or numbers decline throughout the food supply chain. Numerous papers and guidelines have described the basic approaches and methods for conducting microbial risk assessments. According to the Codex Alimentarius, the four steps of a risk assessment are hazard identification, exposure assessment, hazard characterization, and risk characterization. Risk assessments can be either qualitative or quantitative. Risk assessment also can focus on a specific segment(s) of the food chain or encompass the entire food continuum. The chapter focuses on stochastic sensitivity analysis; however, less detailed methods to conduct deterministic and worst-case sensitivity analysis are also described. The link between a deterministic risk assessment and food safety objective (FSO) is pretty straightforward but might not be entirely realistic because deterministic models do not account for uncertainty and variability, which are inevitable when conducting a microbial risk assessment.

Citation: Ruzante J, Whiting R, Dennis S, Buchanan R. 2013. Microbial Risk Assessment, p 1023-1037. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch41
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Figure 41.1

Codex Alimentarius risk analysis framework. doi:10.1128/9781555818463.ch41f1

Citation: Ruzante J, Whiting R, Dennis S, Buchanan R. 2013. Microbial Risk Assessment, p 1023-1037. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch41
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Figure 41.2

Schematic representation of the Monte Carlo analysis. doi:10.1128/9781555818463.ch41f2

Citation: Ruzante J, Whiting R, Dennis S, Buchanan R. 2013. Microbial Risk Assessment, p 1023-1037. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch41
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Figure 41.3

Example of seven potential risk assessment outputs. doi:10.1128/9781555818463.ch41f3

Citation: Ruzante J, Whiting R, Dennis S, Buchanan R. 2013. Microbial Risk Assessment, p 1023-1037. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch41
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Figure 41.4

Tornado graph of influential variability parameters on log risk of illness per serving of raw oysters from the Gulf Coast (Louisiana) winter harvest ( ). doi:10.1128/9781555818463.ch41f4

Citation: Ruzante J, Whiting R, Dennis S, Buchanan R. 2013. Microbial Risk Assessment, p 1023-1037. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch41
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Figure 41.5

Example of the application of risk management metrics in a hypothetical food process. Trans., transportation. doi:10.1128/9781555818463.ch41f5

Citation: Ruzante J, Whiting R, Dennis S, Buchanan R. 2013. Microbial Risk Assessment, p 1023-1037. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch41
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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 41.1

Example of rules for assigning categorical probabilities from two-component probabilities

Citation: Ruzante J, Whiting R, Dennis S, Buchanan R. 2013. Microbial Risk Assessment, p 1023-1037. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch41
Generic image for table
Table 41.2

Individual and combined risk estimates for introduction and transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 in 1-km buffer zones surrounding compartmentalized poultry farms in Thailand

Citation: Ruzante J, Whiting R, Dennis S, Buchanan R. 2013. Microbial Risk Assessment, p 1023-1037. In Doyle M, Buchanan R (ed), Food Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818463.ch41

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