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Chapter 24 : Deciphering the Language of Diplomacy

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Deciphering the Language of Diplomacy, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

This chapter talks about deciphering the language of diplomacy give and take in the study of the squid-vibrio symbiosis. The colonization of epithelia by microbes is the most common and ancient form of animal symbiosis. Throughout the evolutionary history of animals, from early beginnings through the invasion of the land, and into the current biosphere, the most common type of animal-microbe association has been the colonization of the outer surfaces of animal epithelia by populations of one or more microbial species. For the last 20+ years, biologists have been studying the processes by which bacteria colonize animal epithelial surfaces, using the model association between the Hawaiian bobtail squid, , and the marine bioluminescent bacterium . The study of this association evolved as "symbioses" between biologists from two very different fields, microbiology and animal biology. Distinct species have evolved strange new abilities that allow them to inhabit even the most forbidding of environments. Critical to the development of this research over the past 20 years has been the willingness of our students and collaborators to join us in this adventure. These important tools have allowed us to begin deciphering the molecular language of symbiosis between bacteria and animal epithelia.

Citation: McFall-Ngai M, Ruby N. 2012. Deciphering the Language of Diplomacy, p 173-180. In Kolter R, Maloy S (ed), Microbes and Evolution. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818470.ch24

Key Concept Ranking

Vibrio fischeri
0.5441176
Photobacterium leiognathi
0.5147059
Marine Bacteria
0.49470034
Confocal Microscopy
0.45583478
Confocal Microscopes
0.40691724
Pathogenic Bacteria
0.40046936
0.5441176
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Figure 1

Generating the animal resources needed to study the squid-vibrio symbiosis. Male and female adults are maintained in individual seawater “condominiums” (upper left, the “condo” complex), where they mate and lay eggs (bar, 0.25 m). The females lay the eggs on hard substrates in their environment and cover them with sand. In our culturing facility, within 1 day of the eggs being laid, they are removed into a separate tank (lower left), so that they are not exposed during their embryonic period to symbiotic cells released from the adults (bar, 0.1 m). An individual clutch (upper right) of about 200 eggs has been deposited by a female on a piece of coral rubble (bar, 1 cm). A juvenile (lower right) will hatch from each egg after an embryonic period of ~20 days. In this photograph, the two lower darkened areas are the eyes and the upper dark area is the nascent light organ, which can be seen through the translucent body surface (bar, 0.5 mm). doi:10.1128/9781555818470.ch24f1

Citation: McFall-Ngai M, Ruby N. 2012. Deciphering the Language of Diplomacy, p 173-180. In Kolter R, Maloy S (ed), Microbes and Evolution. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818470.ch24
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