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Chapter 120 : Chimerism Testing

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Abstract:

Chimerism testing is routinely used after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to monitor engraftment, detect relapse, identify patients with increased risk for graft-versus-host disease or graft loss, and monitor the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Chimerism testing can also be useful in other settings, such as detecting engraftment of donor lymphocytes after organ transplantation and determining sample identity (e.g., investigating suspected sample exchanges).

Citation: Baxter-Lowe L. 2016. Chimerism Testing, p 1161-1168. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch120
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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

STR alleles differ in their lengths due to differences in the numbers of tandemly repeated sequence motifs. This figure shows a simple STR, which is referred to as a tetranucleotide repeat because there are 4 nucleotides in the motif. STRs used for chimerism testing are usually dinucleotide, trinucleotide, tetranucleotide, or pentanucleotide repeats.

Citation: Baxter-Lowe L. 2016. Chimerism Testing, p 1161-1168. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch120
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Identifying informative STR loci. Electropherograms of a multiplex PCR for four STR loci are shown for an HSCT recipient (top) and donor (bottom). For D21S11, the donor and recipient are homozygous for alleles of the same length (223 bp). For D18S51, the recipient is homozygous for an allele that is 285 bp. The donor shares this allele and has an additional allele that is 302 bp. Thus, D18S51 is a donor-informative locus. For D16S539, the donor and recipient share an allele that is 364 bp, and there are informative alleles for the donor (360 bp) and recipient (352 bp). For Penta D, there are two informative alleles for the recipient (422 and 441 bp) and the donor (394 and 417 bp).

Citation: Baxter-Lowe L. 2016. Chimerism Testing, p 1161-1168. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch120
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

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