1887

Chapter 41 : Immunofluorescence Methods in the Diagnosis of Renal and Cardiac Diseases

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $30.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Immunofluorescence Methods in the Diagnosis of Renal and Cardiac Diseases, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555818722/9781555818715_CH41-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555818722/9781555818715_CH41-2.gif

Abstract:

Immunofluorescence is a well-established technique for the detection of antigens in tissue sections or cell suspensions (1, 2). The technique was developed in 1941 by Albert Coons to demonstrate the presence of pneumococcal antigens in tissue (3). Since then, immunofluorescence has become a crucial tool in the diagnosis and determination of prognoses of immunologically mediated disease (4). Direct immunofluorescence (defined as the application of specific antibodies to detect specific antigens in tissue) is a sensitive and well-established technique for the detection of tissue-bound immunoglobulins, their subclasses, complement components (C3, C1q, and C4d), amyloidogenic proteins, and fibrin-fibrinogen. In the kidney, many forms of primary glomerulonephritis are characterized by deposition of immunoreactants in distinctive diagnostic patterns. The primary renal targets are the glomerulus, the proximal tubules, and the interstitium. In the heart or open fat pad biopsy specimens, direct immunofluorescence is useful to speciate the type of amyloid identified on specimens with positive Congo red staining in paraffin-embedded tissue (5). The diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejections in heart and kidney allografts is facilitated by the detection of C4d (6–8). This chapter will also emphasize the common immunofluorescence techniques used for diagnosis and interpretation with kidney and skin biopsy specimens.

Citation: Collins A, Stone J, Smith R. 2016. Immunofluorescence Methods in the Diagnosis of Renal and Cardiac Diseases, p 376-384. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch41
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Acute alloantibody-mediated rejections. (Left) Cardiac allograft with diffuse capillary staining for C4d. (Right) Acute alloantibody-mediated rejection of a renal allograft with diffuse peritubular capillary staining for C4d.

Citation: Collins A, Stone J, Smith R. 2016. Immunofluorescence Methods in the Diagnosis of Renal and Cardiac Diseases, p 376-384. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch41
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Cardiac kappa light chain amyloidosis. (Left) Positive anti-kappa light chain, 200 ms. (Right) Negative anti-lambda light chain, 200 ms.

Citation: Collins A, Stone J, Smith R. 2016. Immunofluorescence Methods in the Diagnosis of Renal and Cardiac Diseases, p 376-384. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch41
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3

Cardiac lambda light chain amyloidosis. (Left) Positive anti-lambda light chain, 500 ms. (Middle) Negative kappa light chain, 500 ms. (Right) Negative transthyretin light chain with background staining, 500 ms.

Citation: Collins A, Stone J, Smith R. 2016. Immunofluorescence Methods in the Diagnosis of Renal and Cardiac Diseases, p 376-384. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch41
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 4
FIGURE 4

Kidney, cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis, and hepatitis C-related IgM (left) and kappa (right) pseudothrombi.

Citation: Collins A, Stone J, Smith R. 2016. Immunofluorescence Methods in the Diagnosis of Renal and Cardiac Diseases, p 376-384. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch41
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 5
FIGURE 5

Caridac senile systemic amyloidosis (native transthyretin). (Left) Negative anti-IgG with background staining, 200 ms. (Right) Positive anti-transthyretin, 200 ms.

Citation: Collins A, Stone J, Smith R. 2016. Immunofluorescence Methods in the Diagnosis of Renal and Cardiac Diseases, p 376-384. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch41
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 6
FIGURE 6

IgA nephropathy: mesangial IgA deposits.

Citation: Collins A, Stone J, Smith R. 2016. Immunofluorescence Methods in the Diagnosis of Renal and Cardiac Diseases, p 376-384. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch41
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 7
FIGURE 7

Lupus nephritis: granular IgG within the GBM and mesangium. (Panel A, left) Kappa and lambda similar; (middle) segmental granular IgM in the GBM with wire loops; (right) segmental granular IgA within the GBM with wire loop. (Panel B, left) Granular C3 within the GBM and mesangium; (middle) granular C1q within the GBM and mesangium; (right) granular IgG in the tubular basement membranes, tissue ANA.

Citation: Collins A, Stone J, Smith R. 2016. Immunofluorescence Methods in the Diagnosis of Renal and Cardiac Diseases, p 376-384. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch41
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 8
FIGURE 8

Idiopathic/primary membranous nephropathy. (Left) Granular IgG4 within the GBM (green). (Middle) Granular PLA2R within the GBM and staining of the podocytes (red). (Right) Colocalization of the granular IgG4 with the PLA2R antigen (yellow).

Citation: Collins A, Stone J, Smith R. 2016. Immunofluorescence Methods in the Diagnosis of Renal and Cardiac Diseases, p 376-384. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch41
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555818722.ch41
1. Collins AB, Bhan AK, Dienstag JL, Colvin RB, Haupert GT Jr, Mushahwar IK, McCluskey RT. 1983. Hepatitis B immune complex glomerulonephritis: simultaneous glomerular deposition of hepatitis B surface and e antigens. Clin Immunol Immunopathol 26:137153.[PubMed].[CrossRef]
2. Walker PD, Cavallo T, Bonsib SM Ad Hoc Committee on Renal Biopsy Guidelines of the Renal Pathology Society. 2004. Practice guidelines for the renal biopsy. Mod Pathol 17:15551563.[CrossRef].[PubMed]
3. Coons AH, Creech HJ, Jones RN, Berliner E. 1942. The demonstration of pneumococcal antigen in tissues by the use of immunofluorescent antibody. J Immunol 45:159170.
4. McCluskey RT, Collins AB, Niles JL,. 1995. Kidney, p 109122. In Colvin RB, Bhan AK, McCluskey RT (ed), Diagnostic Immunopathology. Raven, New York, NY.
5. Collins AB, Smith RN, Stone JR. 2009. Classification of amyloid deposits in diagnostic cardiac specimens by immunofluorescence. Cardiovasc Pathol 18:205216.[CrossRef].[PubMed]
6. Collins AB, Schneeberger EE, Pascual MA, Saidman SL, Williams WW, Tolkoff-Rubin N, Cosimi AB, Colvin RB. 1999. Complement activation in acute humoral renal allograft rejection: diagnostic significance of C4d deposits in peritubular capillaries. J Am Soc Nephrol 10:22082214.[PubMed]
7. Mauiyyedi S, Colvin RB. 2002. Humoral rejection in kidney transplantation: new concepts in diagnosis and treatment. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens 11:609618.[CrossRef].[PubMed]
8. Mauiyyedi S, Pelle PD, Saidman S, Collins AB, Pascual M, Tolkoff-Rubin NE, Williams WW, Cosimi AA, Schneeberger EE, Colvin RB. 2001. Chronic humoral rejection: identification of antibody-mediated chronic renal allograft rejection by C4d deposits in peritubular capillaries. J Am Soc Nephrol 12:574582.[PubMed]
9. Sethi S, Theis JD, Vrana JA, Fervenza FC, Sethi A, Qian Q, Quint P, Leung N, Dogan A, Nasr SH. 2013. Laser microdissection and proteomic analysis of amyloidosis, cryoglobulinemic GN, fibrillary GN, and immunotactoid glomerulopathy. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 8:915921.[CrossRef].[PubMed]
10. Larsen CP, Messias NC, Silva FG, Messias E, Walker PD. 2013. Determination of primary versus secondary membranous glomerulopathy utilizing phospholipase A2 receptor staining in renal biopsies. Mod Pathol 26:709715.[CrossRef].[PubMed]
11. Collins AB, Farkash EA, Beck LH, Smith RN, Colvin RB. 2013. Detection of PLA2R in glomerular deposits in membranous nephropathy cases seronegative for anti-PLA2R, abstr FR-OR008. American Society of Nephrology, Washington, D.C.
12. Haas M, Sis B, Racusen LC, Solez K, Glotz D, Colvin RB, Castro MC, David DS, David-Neto E, Bagnasco SM, Cendales LC, Cornell LD, Demetris AJ, Drachenberg CB, Farver CF, Farris AB III, Gibson IW, Kraus E, Liapis H, Loupy A, Nickeleit V, Randhawa P, Rodriguez ER, Rush D, Smith RN, Tan CD, Wallace WD, Mengel M Banff Meeting Report Writing Committee. 2014. Banff 2013 meeting report: inclusion of c4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection and antibody-associated arterial lesions. Am J Transplant 14:272283.[CrossRef].[PubMed]
13. Smith RN, Brousaides N, Grazette L, Saidman S, Semigran M, Disalvo T, Madsen J, Dec GW, Perez-Atayde AR, Collins AB. 2005. C4d deposition in cardiac allografts correlates with alloantibody. J Heart Lung Transplant 24:12021210.[CrossRef].[PubMed]

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error