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Chapter 44 : Diagnostic Methods for Group A Streptococcal Infections

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Diagnostic Methods for Group A Streptococcal Infections, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Group A streptococcus, also known as , is an important bacterial pathogen that is the most frequent bacterial cause of acute pharyngitis. It also causes a multitude of other cutaneous and systemic infections, including impetigo, scarlet fever, necrotizing fasciitis, and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The pathogen has a unique tendency to initiate autoimmunity after acute infection, resulting in the nonsuppurative sequelae acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis (AGN). The heart disease resulting from ARF has been responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality in all parts of the world.

Citation: Litwin C, Litwin S, Hill H. 2016. Diagnostic Methods for Group A Streptococcal Infections, p 394-403. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch44
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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Schematic diagram of cellular and extracellular antigens of group A streptococci.

Citation: Litwin C, Litwin S, Hill H. 2016. Diagnostic Methods for Group A Streptococcal Infections, p 394-403. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch44
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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE 1

M serotypes associated with nonsuppurative sequelae

Citation: Litwin C, Litwin S, Hill H. 2016. Diagnostic Methods for Group A Streptococcal Infections, p 394-403. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch44
Generic image for table
TABLE 2

Clinical manifestations of group A streptococcal infection and ARF

Citation: Litwin C, Litwin S, Hill H. 2016. Diagnostic Methods for Group A Streptococcal Infections, p 394-403. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch44
Generic image for table
TABLE 3

Host immune response to group A streptococcal infection

Citation: Litwin C, Litwin S, Hill H. 2016. Diagnostic Methods for Group A Streptococcal Infections, p 394-403. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch44
Generic image for table
TABLE 4

Research Use Only tests for detection of antibodies to extracellular antigens

Citation: Litwin C, Litwin S, Hill H. 2016. Diagnostic Methods for Group A Streptococcal Infections, p 394-403. In Detrick B, Schmitz J, Hamilton R (ed), Manual of Molecular and Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Eighth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818722.ch44

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