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Chapter 10.2 : Selection, Maintenance, and Observation of Uninoculated Monolayer Cell Cultures

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Selection, Maintenance, and Observation of Uninoculated Monolayer Cell Cultures, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Viruses may contain genetic information for many functions in addition to viral structural protein genes, notably those associated with replication and immune system modulation. However, even viruses with very large genomes and extensive viral-coded functions are all obligate intracellular parasites, requiring metabolically active cells to support their replication. Many human pathogenic viruses can be cultured in readily available cell culture monolayers ( Table 10.2–1 ). However, some can be isolated only by using specialized systems ( Table 10.2–2 ) such as organ culture, suspension leukocyte culture, or animals. Additionally, there are several agents for which no system has been identified.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Selection, Maintenance, and Observation of Uninoculated Monolayer Cell Cultures, p 10.2.1-10.2.11. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch10.2
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Figures

Image of Figure 10.2–1
Figure 10.2–1

Assessment, incubation, and maintenance of uninoculated cell cultures.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Selection, Maintenance, and Observation of Uninoculated Monolayer Cell Cultures, p 10.2.1-10.2.11. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch10.2
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Image of Figure 10.2–2
Figure 10.2–2

Focal area of replicating A-549 cells that have cross-contaminated an MRC-5 monolayer.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Selection, Maintenance, and Observation of Uninoculated Monolayer Cell Cultures, p 10.2.1-10.2.11. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch10.2
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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 10.2–1

Monolayer cell cultures used for viral culture

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Selection, Maintenance, and Observation of Uninoculated Monolayer Cell Cultures, p 10.2.1-10.2.11. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch10.2
Generic image for table
Table 10.2–2

Viral culture systems and availability

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Selection, Maintenance, and Observation of Uninoculated Monolayer Cell Cultures, p 10.2.1-10.2.11. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch10.2
Generic image for table
Table 10.2–3

Assessment of monolayer cell cultures and troubleshooting

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Selection, Maintenance, and Observation of Uninoculated Monolayer Cell Cultures, p 10.2.1-10.2.11. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch10.2

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