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Chapter 13.3 : E S C

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Citation: Leber A. 2016. E S C, p 13.3.1.1-13.3.7.6. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch13.3
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Figure 13.3.1–1

Flowchart for concentration by filtration.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. E S C, p 13.3.1.1-13.3.7.6. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch13.3
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Image of Figure 13.3.1–2
Figure 13.3.1–2

Flowchart for direct plating.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. E S C, p 13.3.1.1-13.3.7.6. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch13.3
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Image of Figure 13.3.1–3
Figure 13.3.1–3

Identification flow scheme for basic identification of spp.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. E S C, p 13.3.1.1-13.3.7.6. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch13.3
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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
Bacterial contaminant standards for hemodialysis (CMS conditions for coverage)

Bacterial contaminant standards for hemodialysis (CMS conditions for coverage)

Citation: Leber A. 2016. E S C, p 13.3.1.1-13.3.7.6. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch13.3
Generic image for table
Bacterial contaminant standards for hemodialysis (current ANSI/AAMI recommendation)

Bacterial contaminant standards for hemodialysis (current ANSI/AAMI recommendation)

Citation: Leber A. 2016. E S C, p 13.3.1.1-13.3.7.6. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch13.3
Generic image for table
Table 13.3.3–1

Air samplers for quantitation of viable fungal spores

Citation: Leber A. 2016. E S C, p 13.3.1.1-13.3.7.6. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch13.3
Generic image for table
Table 13.3.4–1

Considerations before undertaking environmental surface sampling

Citation: Leber A. 2016. E S C, p 13.3.1.1-13.3.7.6. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch13.3
Generic image for table
Table 13.3.4–2

Comparison of surface sampling methods

Citation: Leber A. 2016. E S C, p 13.3.1.1-13.3.7.6. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch13.3
Generic image for table
Table 13.3.4–3

Neutralizers of common disinfectant chemicals

Citation: Leber A. 2016. E S C, p 13.3.1.1-13.3.7.6. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch13.3
Generic image for table
Table 13.3.5–1

Organisms cultured from blood products in TTBI

Citation: Leber A. 2016. E S C, p 13.3.1.1-13.3.7.6. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch13.3
Generic image for table
Table 13.3.5–2

Characteristics of FDA-approved systems for the detection of bacterial contamination in platelet units

Citation: Leber A. 2016. E S C, p 13.3.1.1-13.3.7.6. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch13.3
Generic image for table
Table 13.3.5–3

Contaminating organisms in HSC products

Citation: Leber A. 2016. E S C, p 13.3.1.1-13.3.7.6. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch13.3

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