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Chapter 16.12 : Q Fever—

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Q Fever—, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

is the etiologic agent of Q fever. It is a pleomorphic coccobacillus that is Gram-negative, obligately intracellular, and 0.3 to 0.7 μm long. is phylogenetically related to , and , within the group of the subdivision. It is more distantly related to ( ). There is phase variation, similar to that in , in which the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) varies chemically as either the virulent, phase I “smooth” type LPS, or the phase II “rough” LPS, associated with avirulent Q fever is a zoonotic disease, especially of parturient goats, sheep, or cattle and, occasionally, domestic cats. That the infectious dose is very low, combined with properties of aerosolized contaminated dust particles being an efficient source of infection, and resistance to inactivation in the environment, makes a potential agent of bioterrorism. It has historically been developed for such a purpose and hence classified as a non-Tier 1 select agent by the CDC, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The primary purpose of this protocol is to guide the sentinel clinical laboratory in diagnostic sample collection and handling and to assist in the interpretation of serologic test results.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Q Fever—, p 16.12.1-16.12.7. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.12
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Figures

Image of Figure 16.12–1
Figure 16.12–1

Annual reported incidence (per million population) for Q fever in the United States for 2008 (http://www.cdc.gov/qfever/images/statsEpi/QFever_incid.jpg).

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Q Fever—, p 16.12.1-16.12.7. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.12
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Image of Figure 16.12–2
Figure 16.12–2

Fibroblast L929 cell line infected with (courtesy of Didier Raoult).

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Q Fever—, p 16.12.1-16.12.7. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.12
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Image of Figure 16.12–3
Figure 16.12–3

Small granulomas exhibiting doughnut appearance.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Q Fever—, p 16.12.1-16.12.7. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.12
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References

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1. Heinzen RH. 1997. Intracellular development of Coxiella burnetii, p 99–130. In Anderson B, Friedman H, and Bendinelli M (ed), Rick-ettsial Infection and Immunity. Plenum Press, New York, NY.
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16. Klee SR, Tyczka J, Ellerbrok H, Franz T, Linke S, Balijer G, Appel B. 2006. Highly sensitive real-time PCR for specific detection and quantification of Coxiella burnetii. BMC Microbiol 6:2.
17. Setiyono A, Ogawa M, Cai Y, Shiga S, Kishimoto T, Kurane I. 2005. New criteria for immunofluorescence assay for Q fever diagnosis in Japan. J Clin Microbiol 43:55555559.
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19. Rolain J-M, Raoult D, Marmion BP, Harris R.J, Storm P, Ayres JG. 2005. Molecular detection of Coxiella burnetii in blood and sera during Q fever. QJM 98:615620.

Tables

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Citation: Leber A. 2016. Q Fever—, p 16.12.1-16.12.7. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.12
Generic image for table
Table 16.12–1

Typical Q fever diagnostic titers with indirect immunofluorescence ( )

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Q Fever—, p 16.12.1-16.12.7. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.12

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