1887

Chapter 16.4 : Anthrax—

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $30.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Anthrax—, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555818814/9781555818814_Chap16.4-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555818814/9781555818814_Chap16.4-2.gif

Abstract:

the agent of anthrax, is a zoonotic disease that is transmissible to humans through consumption or handling of contaminated products; it is an aerobic, spore-forming, nonmotile, large Gram-positive bacterium ( ). It is classified as a Tier I, Category A agent because of its suitability for use as a biothreat agent in an attack or commission of a biocrime. This procedure describes the steps to rule out, recognize, and presumptively identify this organism in clinical specimens in sentinel clinical laboratories. Such laboratories are defined as those that are certified to perform high-complexity testing under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment of 1988 (CLIA’88) by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for the applicable microbiology specialty. Laboratory in-house testing includes Gram stains and at least one of the following: lower respiratory tract, wound, or blood cultures.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Anthrax—, p 16.4.1-16.4.10. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.4
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of Figure 16.4–1
Figure 16.4–1

Gram stain of blood culture containing Photo courtesy of Dr. James Rudrick, Michigan Department of Community Health.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Anthrax—, p 16.4.1-16.4.10. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.4
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 16.4–2
Figure 16.4–2

Colonies of on blood agar. Photo courtesy of Association of Public Health Laboratories.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Anthrax—, p 16.4.1-16.4.10. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.4
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 16.4–3
Figure 16.4–3

identification flowchart.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Anthrax—, p 16.4.1-16.4.10. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.4
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555818814.chap16.4
1.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2000. Use of anthrax vaccine in the United States. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 49(RR-15):120.
2. Christopher GW, Cieslak TJ, Pavlin JA, Eitzen EM. 1997. Biological warfare: a historical perspective. JAMA 278:412417.
3. Lucey D. 2005. Anthrax, p 3618. In Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R (ed), Principles of Infectious Diseases, 6th ed. Elsevier Churchill, Livingstone, Philadelphia, PA.
4. Mayo L, Eionee-Odeom J, Talbot EA, Adamski C, Bean C, Daly ER, Gao G, Gouglet R, Montero J, Morse D, Smith J, Berry R, McGarry F, Wimsatt M, Stamm L, Madoff L, Gauthier C, Nalipinski M, Hoffmaster AR, Shadomy SV, Pesik NT, Smith TL, Rose LJ, Martinez K, Burrier SL, Stauffer K. 2010. Gastrointestinal anthrax after an animal hide drumming event–New Hampshire and Massachusetts, 2009. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 59:872877.
5. Stradis J, LeRoy S, Barden D, Kelley K, Fontana J, Purviance K, Cartter M, Hadler J, Glynn K, Hoffmaster A, Guerra M, Shadomy S, Smith T, Martson C, Martinez K, Guh A. 2008. Cutaneous anthrax associated with drum making using goat hides from West Africa-Connecticut, 2007. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 57:628631.
6. Sullivan M. 2011. MLS Update: MDH Requests Assistance with Ongoing Anthrax Investigation. Minnesota Laboratory System.
7. Bradaric N, Punda-Polic V. 1992. Cutaneous anthrax due to penicillin-resistant B. anthracis transmitted by an insect bite. Lancet 340:306307.
8. Franz DR, Zajtchuk R. 2000. Biological terrorism: understanding the threat, preparation, and medical response. Dis Mon 46:125192.
9. Turrell MJ, Knudson GB. 1987. Mechanical transmission of B. anthracis by stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans) and mosquitos (Aedes aegypti and Aedes taeniorhynchus). Infect Immun 55:18591861.
10. Chin J. 2000. Anthrax. p 2025. In Chin J (ed), Control of Communicable Diseases Manual, 17th ed. American Public Health Association, Washington, DC.
11. Dixon TC, Meselson M, Guillemin JG, Hanna PC. 1999. Anthrax. N Engl J Med 341:815826.
12. Eitzen E, Pavlin J, Cieslak T, Christopher G, Culpepper R (ed). 1999. Medical Management of Biological Casualties Handbook, 3rd ed. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, MD.
13. Friedlander AM. 1997. Anthrax, p 476478. In Zajtchuk R (ed), Textbook of Military Medicine: Medical Aspects of Chemical and Biological Warfare. Department of the Army, Washington, DC.
14.Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force. 1996. NATO Handbook on the Medical Aspects of NBC Defensive Operations. Departments of Army, Navy and Air Force, Washington, DC.
15. Cieslak TJ, Eitzen EM. 1997. Clinical and epidemiological principles of anthrax. Emerg Infect Dis 5:552555.
16. Shafzand S, Doyle R, Ruoss S, Weinsacker A, Rafin T. 1995. Inhalational anthrax. Chest 116:13691376.
17. Wiener SL, Barret J. 1986. Biological warfare defense. In Trauma Management for Civilian and Military Physicians. W. B. Saunders, Philadelphia, PA.
18.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1998. Bioterrorism alleging use of anthrax and interim guidelines for management–United States. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 48:6974.
19. Logan NA, Turnbull PCB. 1999. Bacillus and recently derived genera, p 357363. In Murray PR, Baron EJ, Pfaller MA, Tenover FC, Yolken RH (ed), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 7th ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
20.U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Institutes of Health. 2007. Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL), 5th ed. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/OD/OHS/biosfty/bmbl5/bmbl.
21. Fleming DO, Richardson JH, Tullis JJ, Vesley D (ed). 1995. Laboratory Safety and Principles and Practices, 2nd ed. American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC.
22. Franz DR, Jahrling PB, Friedlander AM, McClain DJ, Hoover DL, Bryne WR, Paulin JA, Christopher GW, Eitzen EM. 1997. Clinical recognition and management of patients exposed to biological warfare agents. JAMA 278:399411.
23. Hail AS, Rossi CA, Ludwig GV, Invans BE, Tammeriello RF, Henchall DA. 1999. Comparison of noninvasive sampling sites for early detection of Bacillus anthracis spores from rhesus monkeys after aerosol exposure. Mil Med 164:833837.
24. Weyant RS, Ezzell JW, Popovic T, Lindsay KQ, Morse SA. 1999. Basic laboratory protocols for the presumptive identification of Bacillus anthracis. In Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response. http://www.bt.cdc.gov.
25. English JF, Cundiff MY, Malone JD, Pfeiffer JA, Bell M, Steele L, Miller M. 1999. APIC Bioterrorism Task Force and CDC Working Group. Bioterrorism Readiness Plan: a Template for Healthcare Facilities, p 89. Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Washington, DC.
26. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2000. Biological and chemical terrorism: strategic plan for preparedness and response. MMWR Recomm Rep, 49(RR-4):114.
27. Gilchrist MJ, McKinney WP, Miller JM, Weissfeld AS. 2000. Cumitech 33, Laboratory Safety, Management, and Diagnosis of Biological Agents Associated with Bioterrorism. Coordinating ed. Snyder JW. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
28. Klietmann WF, Ruoff KL. 2001. Bioterrorism: Implication for the clinical microbiologist. Clin Microbiol Rev 14:364381.
29. Sharp SE, Loeffelholz M. 2011. Biothreat agents, p 174187. In Versalovic J, Jorgenson JH, Landry ML, Warnock DW (ed), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 10th ed. American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC.

Tables

Generic image for table
Untitled

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Anthrax—, p 16.4.1-16.4.10. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.4

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error