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Chapter 16.8 : Tularemia—

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Tularemia—, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

is a fastidious, tiny, Gram-negative coccobacillus and the etiological agent of tularemia. Due to its low infectious dose (<10 organisms) and ability to be acquired via inhalation, presents a risk to public health and safety and as such is classified as a Tier 1 select agent and toxin by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Tularemia—, p 16.8.1-16.8.10. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.8
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Figures

Image of Figure 16.8–1
Figure 16.8–1

Gram stain of (×1000). Photo courtesy of Cheryl Gauthier, MA Dept. of Public Health

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Tularemia—, p 16.8.1-16.8.10. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.8
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Image of Figure 16.8–2
Figure 16.8–2

on CHOC and Sheep Blood Agar (SBA) at 24, 48, and 72 h. Photo courtesy of: Maj. Todd Kijek and Dr. Kei Amemiya, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Tularemia—, p 16.8.1-16.8.10. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.8
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Image of Figure 16.8–3
Figure 16.8–3

identification flowchart. LRN, Laboratory Response Network.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Tularemia—, p 16.8.1-16.8.10. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.8
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References

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1. Pike RM. 1976. Laboratory-associated infections: summary and analysis of 3921 cases. Health Lab Sci 13:105114.
2. Shapiro D, Schwartz DR. 2002. Exposure of laboratory workers to F. tularensis despite a bioterrorism procedure. J Clin Microbiol 40:22782281.
3. Singh K. 2009. Laboratory acquired infections. Clin Infect Dis 49:142147.
4. Larssen KW, Afset JE, Heier BT, Krogh T, Handeland K, Vikøren T, Bergh K. 2011. Outbreak of tularemia in central Norway, January to March 2011. Euro Surveill16: pii: 19828.
5. Dikici N, Ural O, Sümer S, Oztürk K, Albayrak Yiğit O, Katlanır E, Keleş B. 2012. Tularemia in Konya region, Turkey. Mikrobiyol Bul 46:225235. Turkish.
6. Morner T. 1992. The ecology of tularemia. Rev Sci Tech 11:11231130.
7. Foley JE, Nieto NC. 2010. Tularemia. Vet Microbiol 140:332338.
8. Dennis DT, Inglesby TV, Henderson DA, Bartlett JG, Ascher MS, Eitzen E, Fine AD, Friedlander AM, Hauer J, Layton M, Lillibridge SR, McDade JE, Osterholm MT, O’Toole T, Parker G, Perl TM, Russell PK, Tonat K. 2001. Tularemia as a biological weapon: medical and public health management. JAMA 285:27632773.
9. Christopher GW, Cieslak TJ, Pavlin JA, Eitzen EA. 1997. Biological warfare: a historical perspective. JAMA 278:412417.
10. McClendon MK, Apicella MA, Allen LA. 2006. Francisella tularensis: taxonomy, genetics, and immunopathogenesis of a potential agent of biowarfare. Annu Rev Microbiol 60:167185.
11. Penn RL. 2015. Francisella tularensis (Tularemia), p 25902602. In Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ (eds), Mandell, Douglas, Bennett’s Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, 8th ed. Elsevier Saunders, Philadelphia, PA.
12. Nigrovic LE, Wingerter SL. 2008. Tularemia. Infect Dis Clin North Am 22:489504.
13. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Institutes of Health. 2007. Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL), 5th ed. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/OD/OHS/biosfty/bmbl5/bmbl_5th_edition.
14. Petersen JM, Schriefer ME, Araj GF. 2011. Francisella and Brucella, p 751769. In Versalovic J (editor in chief), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 10th ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.

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Citation: Leber A. 2016. Tularemia—, p 16.8.1-16.8.10. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.8

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