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Chapter 16.9 : Melioidosis () and Glanders ()

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Melioidosis () and Glanders (), Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

is the etiologic agent of glanders, a febrile illness typically seen in equines, i.e., horses, mules, and donkeys ( ). It is a nonmotile, aerobic Gram-negative coccobacillus, which may or may not be oxidase positive or grow on MacConkey agar.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Melioidosis () and Glanders (), p 16.9.1-16.9.18. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.9
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Figures

Image of Figure 16.9–1
Figure 16.9–1

48-h culture on blood agar.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Melioidosis () and Glanders (), p 16.9.1-16.9.18. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.9
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Image of Figure 16.9–2
Figure 16.9–2

48-h blood agar.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Melioidosis () and Glanders (), p 16.9.1-16.9.18. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.9
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Image of Figure 16.9–3
Figure 16.9–3

Gram stain of .

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Melioidosis () and Glanders (), p 16.9.1-16.9.18. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.9
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Image of Figure 16.9–4
Figure 16.9–4

growth on blood agar at 24 h.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Melioidosis () and Glanders (), p 16.9.1-16.9.18. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.9
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Image of Figure 16.9–5
Figure 16.9–5

growth on blood agar at 48 h.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Melioidosis () and Glanders (), p 16.9.1-16.9.18. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.9
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Image of Figure 16.9–6
Figure 16.9–6

growth on blood agar at 48 h.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Melioidosis () and Glanders (), p 16.9.1-16.9.18. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.9
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Image of Figure 16.9–7
Figure 16.9–7

Gram stain of . Courtesy of APHL.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Melioidosis () and Glanders (), p 16.9.1-16.9.18. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.9
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Image of Figure 16.9–8
Figure 16.9–8

Flow diagram to rule out or refer . LRN, Laboratory Response Network.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Melioidosis () and Glanders (), p 16.9.1-16.9.18. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.9
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Image of Figure 16.9–9
Figure 16.9–9

Flow diagram to rule out or refer . LRN, Laboratory Response Network.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Melioidosis () and Glanders (), p 16.9.1-16.9.18. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.9
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References

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Citation: Leber A. 2016. Melioidosis () and Glanders (), p 16.9.1-16.9.18. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch16.9

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