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Chapter 2.1 : Collection, Transport, and Manipulation of Clinical Specimens and Initial Laboratory Concerns

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Abstract:

The collection, transport, and processing of clinical specimens are preanalytical steps that are key to organism recovery. Quality specimens must be collected in order to provide the most clinically relevant microbiology results for our patients ( ). To ensure that specimens are collected in an appropriate manner, easy-to-understand instructions for proper specimen collection and transport conditions in the form of a specimen collection manual or instructional how-to sheet should be available either electronically or from printed material and updated regularly in order to ensure that practices are current. The instructional information should be made available to your clinicians, clinical laboratory scientists, nursing staff, patients, or other clients. Specimens are to be labeled with the patient name and medical records number. The last preanalytical consideration before processing the specimen is to ensure that the specimen is processed in accordance with the test ordered and the organism suspected. The tables in this section are meant to be used as a guide for these important preanalytical steps.

Citation: Linscott A. 2016. Collection, Transport, and Manipulation of Clinical Specimens and Initial Laboratory Concerns, p 2.1.1-2.1.30. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch2.1
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References

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1. Miller JM. 1999. A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, 2nd ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
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Tables

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Table 2.1–1

“Rule-out” clinical impressions and potential etiological agents

Citation: Linscott A. 2016. Collection, Transport, and Manipulation of Clinical Specimens and Initial Laboratory Concerns, p 2.1.1-2.1.30. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch2.1
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Table 2.1–2

General principles for specimen collection

Citation: Linscott A. 2016. Collection, Transport, and Manipulation of Clinical Specimens and Initial Laboratory Concerns, p 2.1.1-2.1.30. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch2.1
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Table 2.1–3

Common transport media

Citation: Linscott A. 2016. Collection, Transport, and Manipulation of Clinical Specimens and Initial Laboratory Concerns, p 2.1.1-2.1.30. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch2.1
Generic image for table
Table 2.1–4

Collection of specimens for bacteriological analysis

Citation: Linscott A. 2016. Collection, Transport, and Manipulation of Clinical Specimens and Initial Laboratory Concerns, p 2.1.1-2.1.30. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch2.1
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Table 2.1–5

Rejection criteria for microbiological specimens

Citation: Linscott A. 2016. Collection, Transport, and Manipulation of Clinical Specimens and Initial Laboratory Concerns, p 2.1.1-2.1.30. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch2.1
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Table 2.1–6

Collection of specimens to detect infrequently encountered organisms

Citation: Linscott A. 2016. Collection, Transport, and Manipulation of Clinical Specimens and Initial Laboratory Concerns, p 2.1.1-2.1.30. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch2.1
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Table 2.1–7

Laboratory approaches to suspected fungal infections

Citation: Linscott A. 2016. Collection, Transport, and Manipulation of Clinical Specimens and Initial Laboratory Concerns, p 2.1.1-2.1.30. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch2.1
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Table 2.1–8

Collection of specimens to detect parasites

Citation: Linscott A. 2016. Collection, Transport, and Manipulation of Clinical Specimens and Initial Laboratory Concerns, p 2.1.1-2.1.30. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch2.1
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Table 2.1–9

Specimen processing triage

Citation: Linscott A. 2016. Collection, Transport, and Manipulation of Clinical Specimens and Initial Laboratory Concerns, p 2.1.1-2.1.30. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch2.1
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Table 2.1–10

Procedure for processing clinical specimens in microbiology

Citation: Linscott A. 2016. Collection, Transport, and Manipulation of Clinical Specimens and Initial Laboratory Concerns, p 2.1.1-2.1.30. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch2.1
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Table 2.1–11

Panic values in microbiology

Citation: Linscott A. 2016. Collection, Transport, and Manipulation of Clinical Specimens and Initial Laboratory Concerns, p 2.1.1-2.1.30. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch2.1
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Table 2.1–12

Alert request

Citation: Linscott A. 2016. Collection, Transport, and Manipulation of Clinical Specimens and Initial Laboratory Concerns, p 2.1.1-2.1.30. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch2.1

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